delusion

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See: artifice, bad faith, deception, error, fallacy, false pretense, figment, hoax, insanity, lunacy, phantom, ruse, sham

DELUSION, med. jurisp. A diseased state of the mind, in which persons believe things to exist, which exist only, or in the degree they are conceived of only in their own imaginations, with a persuasion so fixed and firm, that neither evidence nor argument can convince them to the contrary.
     2. The individual is, of course, insane. For example, should a parent unjustly persist without the least ground in attributing to his daughter a course of vice, and use her with uniform unkindness, there not being the slightest pretence or color of reason for the supposition, a just inference of insanity, or delusion, would arise in the minds of a jury: because a supposition long entertained and persisted in, after argument to the contrary, and against the natural affections of a parent, suggests that he must labor under some morbid mental delusion. 3 Addams' R. 90, 91; Id. 180; Hagg. R. 27 and see Dr. Connolly's Inquiry into Insanity, 384; Ray, Med. Jur. Prel. Views., Sec. 20, p. 41, and Sec. 22, p. 47; 3 Addams, R. 79; 1 Litt. R. 371 Annales d'Hygiene Publique, tom. 3, p. 370; 8 Watts, 70; 13 Ves. 89; 1 Pow. Dev. by Jarman, 130, note Shelf. on Lun. 296; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 2104-10.

References in periodicals archive ?
She said he confessed to seeking out a woman for sex at knifepoint and told of bizarre delusions from which he suffered.
Eli is a successful attorney suffering from an inoperable brain aneurysm that causes him to have bizarre delusions.
Other types of delusions found in schizophrenia include somatic, grandiose, reference or more bizarre delusions involving thought control, insertion, or withdrawal.
The terrifying siege on September 10 last year was the culmination of a series of increasingly bizarre delusions the farmer was suffering, the court heard.
All subjects had paranoid delusions; 89% had referential delusions, 53% had grandiose delusions, 32% had somatic delusions, 95% had bizarre delusions, 95% had auditory hallucinations, 68% had visual hallucinations, 26% had tactile hallucinations, 26% had olfactory hallucinations, and 63% had Schneiderian forms of hallucination (such as hearing running commentary or two or more voices conversing with each other).
Dr Stephen Barlow said Samo had a severe mental illness with bizarre delusions and symptoms of schizophrenia, but made a complete recovery.