blight notice

blight notice

in planning law, a notice served on an authority proposing a development indicating that it has been attempting to sell the property with no success and requiring the authority to purchase it because its value has been affected by the plan.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
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References in periodicals archive ?
It lists many bought under a "statutory blight notice".
The family served a blight notice on the Government which respondend with a compulsory purchase order on the farm.
"We just think the plans for this area are taking years and years and we did consider putting what's called a blight notice against the council.
From Tuesday, owneroccupiers within the safeguarded area - typically a corridor 120 metres wide - can now serve a Blight Notice on the Government asking that their home be purchased from them.
Residents whose land is wholly or partially required can serve the DfT with a Blight Notice - forcing the government to buy it.
The WAG agreed to purchase it after accepting a blight notice, which was served by the then owners in November 2008."
A spokeswoman for Cardiff County Council said: 'As far as the council is aware, the blight notice procedure does not apply in these circumstances.' What is a blight order?: A blight order has some similarities to a compulsory purchase order.
Now owner-occupiers within the safeguarded area - typically a corridor 120 metres wide - can now serve a Blight Notice on the Government asking that their home be purchased from them.
Owners who prove they cannot sell a property at the market value because of a proposed road scheme can serve a "blight notice", obliging the scheme's promoter to buy it.
"If you need to move house between now and the beginning of the scheme, then you may be able to serve a blight notice during this period when the shadow of the scheme is hanging over your property, causing values to drop.
The councils are taking legal advice about the potential of getting "blight notices."
"We fully appreciate the economic difficulties you face, but the funding mechanisms that have been suggested as an alternative/replacement for HMRI resources are either inadequate or unrealistic." The letter reveals the councils are seeking legal advice about the potential for home owners to seek blight notices due to the poor state of neighbourhoods that could remain derelict for years.