Blind

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BLIND. One who is deprived of the faculty of seeing.
     2. Persons who are blind may enter into contracts and make wills like others. Carth. 53; Barn. 19, 23; 3 Leigh, R. 32. When an attesting witness becomes blind, his handwriting may be proved as if he were dead. 1 Stark. Ev. 341. But before proving his handwriting the witness must be produced, if within the jurisdiction of the court, and examined. Ld. Raym. 734; 1 M. & Rob. 258; 2 M. & Rob. 262.

References in periodicals archive ?
Back in 1962, a Reader's Digest article foretold a future where, by the year 2002, transport trucks would be museum pieces and the world traveled at blindingly fast speeds in, among other things, pneumatic-powered transports.
It was such a blindingly brilliant tip that I couldn't see well enough while writing it.
"It worked," says Klitzner, "and people are astounded because it is so blindingly simple."
The C-320's a perfect choice to defeat the fiery lizardry It's built like a brick but it's blindingly quick thanks to German engineering wizardry.
It varies from the mathematically bewildering (to most architects, I suspect) to the blindingly obvious (the daylight and view aspects of a Venetian blind, for example).
Acting out in the liberating no-time suggested by the movie's title (August 32 is followed by August 33, etc.), the two crazy kids land in Salt Lake City and get taxied out to vast, blindingly white flats that would put a damper on any kind of sex.
For [exists]TIHW, the six-part suite Ann Carlson offered during Christmastime, the performer and choreographer turned the black-box surround of Dance Theater Workshop into a blindingly bright white space (visual installation by Todd Gilens, lighting by Philip W.
The hard barren slab could get blindingly hot in the summer.
IT'S blindingly obvious that the killer of tragic footballer Shaun Woodburn deserves a longer sentence.
Mr Johnson tried to defend himself yesterday, insisting that once he had written both pro- and anti-EU articles, he could see it was "blindingly obvious" that he would back Brexit.
OMETIMES the blindingly obvious isn't blindingly obvious to people.
I CAN'T remember when surveys started making it big in newspapers but nowadays few days go by without another one reminding us of the blindingly obvious.