Cell

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CELL. A small room in a prison. See Dungeon.

References in periodicals archive ?
ENPNewswire-August 30, 2019--University of Bristol: Artificial red blood cells enable research into malaria invasion
Over time, the number of immature, defective cells in the bone marrow of a person with MDS may exceed the number of healthy cells, and result in lower numbers of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets in the blood.
The researchers found that these painful events are most likely to be produced by immature red blood cells, called reticulocytes, which are more prone to stick to blood vessel walls.
When they used flow cytometry to examine the red blood cells, they found an increase in reactive oxygen species, a natural byproduct of oxygen use that is destructive at high levels.
And why do they only impair the maturation of red blood cells?
Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. People with sickle cell disease have red blood cells that contain mostly hemoglobin S, an abnormal type of hemoglobin.
Locking malaria inside red blood cells may prevent mosquitoes from spreading the disease from person to person, and researchers may now know which key to throw away.
This new research challenges what textbooks have long read: That blood stem cells maintain the day to-day renewal of blood, a conclusion drawn from their importance in re-establishing blood cell populations after bone marrow transplants--a fact that still remains true.
This new research challenges what textbooks have long read: That blood stem cells maintain the day-to-day renewal of blood, a conclusion drawn from their importance in re-establishing blood cell populations after bone marrow transplants--a fact that still remains true.
We divide the area of every convex hull of Red cells and are considered for mask of single Red Blood Cell
Weisel, Ph.D., professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues, discovered a new geometry that red blood cells assume, when compressed during clot formation.