blood

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Related to blood-vessel: blood vessel disease

blood

noun affinity, agnation, ancestry, breed, brethren, brood, children, clan, cognation, common ancessry, consanguinity, derivation, descent, ethnic group, family connection, family relationship, family tie, family tree, filiation, genealogical tree, genealogy, gentility, genus, heredity, heritage, issue, kind, kindred, kinsfolk, kinship, kinsman, kinsmen, kinswoman, line, lineage, nationality, next of kin, offspring, one's people, parentage, pedigree, propinquity, relations, sanguis, stock, strain, ties of family, tribe
Associated concepts: blood heirs, blood issue, blood relatives, full blood, half blood, mixed blood
Foreign phrases: Consanguineus est quasi eodem sannuine natus.A person related by consanguinity is, as it were, one born from the same blood. Pueri sunt de sannuine parentum, sed pater et mater non sunt de sannuine puerorum. Children are of the blood of their parrnts, but the father and mother are not of the blood of their children.
See also: ancestry, bloodline, descent, lineage

BLOOD, kindred. This word, in the law sense, is used to signify relationship, stock, or family; as, of the blood of the ancestor. 1 Roper on Leg. 103; 1 Supp. to Ves. jr. 365. In a more extended sense, it means kindred generally. Bac. Max. Reg. 18.
     2. Brothers and sisters are said to be of the whole blood, (q. v.) if they have the same father and mother of the half blood, (q. v.) if they have only one parent in common. 5 Whart. Rep. 477.

References in periodicals archive ?
They found that many of the blood-vessel cells within the tumours contained genetic markers characteristic of the cancer cells, suggesting that the blood vessels were of tumour origin.
BIBN 4096 BS intervenes by displacing CGRP where it attaches to blood-vessel and nerve cells.
However, when a mixture of the blood-vessel widening drug and vitamin C was injected, blood flow jumped 60 percent in diabetics, according to the study, published this week in The Journal of Clinical Investigation.
An additional 600,000 cases are treated with coronary-bypass surgery that employs blood-vessel grafts to route blood flow around blocked arteries.
However, sometimes the process goes into overdrive, causing smooth muscle cells from inside the blood-vessel wall to multiply and pile up inside the stent.