boardinghouse


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Wolfe's boardinghouse, the Old Kentucky Home, on 48 Spruce Street.
To allay family fears, the corporations in Lowell created boardinghouses with tightly controlled environments presided over by "respectable" women who enforced strict rules--such as mandatory church attendance and a 10 o'clock bedtime--to protect the virtue of the young women and the reputation of the Lowell factories.
But very little has been written about the great foil of the single family home--the distinctly not-home known as the boardinghouse.
Fruitseller, Monk, et al Ron Bagden Man on Train, Boardinghouse Proprietor, et al Chris Harbur Thomas Joshua Henry Camilla, Club Employee, et al Amanda Hunt Frederick et al Adam Kaokept Hannah Anika Larsen Club Girl, Woman in Pawnshop, et al Nicole Lewis Flute Player, Club Girl, et al Kelly McCreary Club Girl, Aunt, et al Eileen Rivera Club Employee, Boo, et al Robb Sapp
DelFresno's boardinghouse and look for more fitting employment.
So Goody and childhood friend Sally Ford found a hulking old boardinghouse in the Nye Beach neighborhood of Newport.
Grampa Bender can't run the Bed and Biscuit animal boardinghouse without the help of his three wise animals, who have always thought of themselves as his 'family'.
One of the men in my boardinghouse knew the captain at the Hollywood station and he told me to get myself a motorcycle and practice riding,'' he recalled.
Although he spent most of his school years in New York, Bearden visited Pittsburgh often, enjoying life in his grandparents' boardinghouse, where mill workers returning from work would sit on the steps and "tell stories about down-home in the South" (1).
Another odd Lords of Dogtown cinema glitch occurred when the producers graciously donated a cast-signed Zephyr Flex skateboard to a charity auction being held on Santa Monica Pier to benefit the Boardinghouse Mentors.
I been living in this rooming house for so long, I reckon I'm just another piece of furniture," says 35-year-old Esther Mills (Viola Davis), who has had to "play merry" at nearly two dozen parties for other women in her boardinghouse who were getting married.
Narrator B: Eight years later, a new worker, Eleanor McDonnell, arrives at a local boardinghouse.