boycott


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Boycott

A lawful concerted attempt by a group of people to express displeasure with, or obtain concessions from, a particular person or company by refusing to do business with them. An unlawful attempt that is prohibited by the Sherman Anti-Trust Act (15 U.S.C.A. § 1 et seq.), to adversely affect a company through threat, coercion, or intimidation of its employees, or to prevent others from doing business with said company. A practice utilized in labor disputes whereby an organized group of employees bands together and refrains from dealing with an employer, the legality of which is determined by applicable provisions of statutes governing labor-management relations.

A classic example of this is a consumer boycott whereby a group of customers refuses to purchase a particular product in order to indicate their dissatisfaction with excessive prices or the offensive actions of a particular manufacturer or producer.

Cross-references

Labor Law.

boycott

n. organized refusal to purchase products or patronize a store to damage the producer or merchant monetarily, to influence its policy, and/or to attract attention to a social cause. Labor unions and their sympathizers have boycotted lettuce and grapes not picked by union farm workers, and civil rights activists have boycotted stores and restaurants that had "white only" hiring policies. The term is named for Captain Charles C. Boycott, a notorious land agent, whose neighbors ostracized him during Ireland's Land League rent wars in the 1880's. Boycotts are not illegal in themselves, unless there are threats or violence involved. A "secondary" boycott, which boycotts those who do business with the primary target of the boycotters, is an unfair labor practice under Federal and state laws. (See: secondary boycott)

boycott

noun abstention from buying, abstention from using, avoidance, ban, banning, black-listing, debarring, embargo, exclusion, ostracism, refusal to do business, rejection, shunning, strike, withholding of patronage
Associated concepts: primary boycott, secondary boycott
See also: ban, condemn, disapprove, eschew, exclude, exclusion, ignore, picket, proscription, reject, shun, strike
References in periodicals archive ?
'Religion does not teach us to be angry, to boycott each other and to hate each other due to our different races and religions, it is only the Opposition encouraging this,' he said.
In fact, Israel should be boycotted in every possible way until it relents and respects international law regarding the rights and freedom of the Palestinian people.
"It affirms the right of all activists and people of conscience to advocate for human rights through boycotts against systems of oppression," Hind Awwad, spokesperson for the Palestinian BDS National Committee stated.
They did not want the incumbent, yet, they boycotted the chance to shove him out.
In the local scene, some boycotts have gone on for months now-those of Nutri-Asia products and Jollibee Foods Corp., for instance.
Some workers said that the party president's boycott was only meant to favour independent candidate Shaukatullah Khan in the election.
The boycott has also impacted the performance of energy companies.
A second example of an industry in which a Western boycott would be effective is microprocessor chips.
The list also includes the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign, the world's most widely spread movement that calls for boycotting Israel.
Boycott was alleged to have said knighthoods were handed out like "confetti" to West Indies cricketers, including Sir Viv Richards, Sir Garfield Sobers and Sir Curtly Ambrose.
Boycott was alleged to have made the comment after claiming that knighthoods were handed out like "confetti" to West Indies cricketers, including Sir Viv Richards, Sir Garfield Sobers and Sir Curtly Ambrose.
Continue reading "The Modern Language Association Voted to Rejects Academic Boycott of Israel" at...