brainwork


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36) From this perspective, then, Johanna Takala's ambiguous brainwork can be seen as a distortion in "the naturalness of a place" that she as a trainee embodies.
Brainwork brings an entourage of digital marketing services - from search engine optimization to social media marketing, pay per click campaigning to email marketing, and more.
"It makes me sad that they are not here," said Ibrahim, whose favorite subject is math because he said it makes his brainwork. "It's boring without them." Even in villages considered "safe," that aren't subject to daily bombings, schools aren't opening, often because they are filled with refugees.
The tastefully done interiors are the brainwork of Khan's beautiful wife Subhalakshmi, a bharatnatyam dancer.
"Brainwork: The Neuroscience Behind How We Lead Others" discusses the psychological aspects of leadership in the business world, discussing the many things we face in the daily business world, and how our brain reacts.
Despite his offensive language, Vettik makes efforts to keep his brainwork agile and asks his wife to send him something to read.
Sousa (author); BRAINWORK; Triple Nickle Press (Nonfiction: Science) 19.95 ISBN: 9780983302032
Empowered by the computer program and the "vast pharmacy" of his own brainwork, and the "raw need" and "hungry armature" (8) of his addicted body, he attains "a level of proficiency exceeding anything he'd known or imagined.
Cecil Lang's work on Swinburne responds to this problem, but it is safe to say that the "fundamental brainwork" of Swinburne's poetry still remains insufficiently understood.
He argued that in the mountains students were exposed to "a climate favourable and conducive to the best continuous brainwork through the year".
FACE TO FACE The new head for Grey's Monument PRE-STRIKE aerial views of Grey 's Monument in 1929 with trams going around BRAINWORK The new head for Grey's Monument under construction
Principles that refer to the opportunity for welfare--proposed by Arneson--or to access to advantage--by Cohen--would require excessively complex calculations and brainwork. They could not be used as a guide to assess a distributive pattern by individuals who occupy the different distributive positions.