breeziness


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As one critic put it, "Welcome to 'Happy Hour,' a new breed of news show, where a younger version of 'Regis & Kelly' meets 'Cheers' with the breeziness of 'Entourage.
Other roles are equally well east though ultimately minor, from Valeria Golino's animalistic breeziness as Pietro's sister-in-law to Gassman's sexy-while-sympathetic uncle routine.
Kingsolver's breeziness sometimes sounds heartless, for it appears to discount as ludicrous people who have committed no greater crime than holding values different from hers.
Jennings' often-fanciful parallels between biblical and modern gay and lesbian culture lend his work a welcome breeziness of tone, but they risk making his insightful readings of these highly provocative biblical texts easier to discount and, regrettably, to resist.
Much better are her tender insights which lift the spirit (Lonely Girl), while her breeziness (What If I'm Right?
In his re-creation of a turbulent era and its main protagonists, he captures the two peoples' essence with a lightness of touch and a breeziness of style that, without wounding, reach their intended targets.
Though small in stature, she had a distinctive raspy voice perfect for satiric irony and played the role with a puckish breeziness that acted as a fitting counterweight to Berowne and the men in general.
Perhaps there is a risk that breeziness will be equated by some readers with something more insidious.
Alas, folksy breeziness doesn't come easily to this group, and it too often feels like Deter is taking the first-act anthem ``Taking It Slow'' a bit too literally.
Gass might celebrate the preeminence of Ralph Waldo Emerson's essays, their pertinence and intelligence, as he does in "Emerson and the Essay" (found in Habitations of the Word), but his own combination of breeziness and erudition produces essays on a wide range of topics--mass culture, the nature of prose in fiction, directions of the contemporary novel, to name a few--that will probably stand as seminal statements for and about late twentieth-and early twenty-first-century culture, specifically the culture of the novel.
He also lends Petrarch's poetry a good deal of the freshness, perhaps even the breeziness, of our modern idiom, which is also his aim, and an entirely defensible one.