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Justice

The proper administration of the law; the fair and equitable treatment of all individuals under the law. A title given to certain judges, such as federal and state supreme court judges.

West's Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

justice

n. 1) fairness. 2) moral rightness. 3) a scheme or system of law in which every person receives his/her/its due from the system, including all rights, both natural and legal. One problem is that attorneys, judges, and legislatures often get caught up more in procedure than in achieving justice for all. Example: the adage "justice delayed is justice denied," applies to the burdensome procedures, lack of sufficient courts, clogging the system with meritless cases, and the use of the courts to settle matters which could be resolved by negotiation. The imbalance between court privileges obtained by attorneys for the wealthy and for the person of modest means, the use of delay and "blizzards" of unnecessary paper by large law firms, and judges who fail to cut through the underbrush of procedure all erode justice. 4) an appellate judge, the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the U. S. Supreme Court, a member of a Federal Court of Appeal, and judges of any of the various state appellate courts.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

justice

see NATURAL JUSTICE.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

JUSTICE. The constant and perpetual disposition to render every man his due. Just. Inst. B. 1, tit. 1. Toullier defines it to be the conformity of our actions and our will to the law. Dr. Civ. Fr. tit. prel. n. 5. In the most extensive sense of the word, it differs little from virtue, for it includes within itself the whole circle of virtues. Yet the common distinction between them is that that which considered positively and in itself, is called virtue, when considered relatively and with respect to others, has the name of justice. But justice being in itself a part of virtue, is confined to things simply good or evil, and consists in a man's taking such a proportion of them as he ought.
     2. Justice is either distributive or commutative. Distributive justice is that virtue whose object is to distribute rewards and punishments to each one according to his merits, observing a just proportion by comparing one person or fact with another, so that neither equal persons have unequal things, nor unequal persons things equal. Tr. of Eq. 3, and Toullier's learned note, Dr. Civ. Fr. tit. prel. n. 7, note.
     3. Commutative justice is that virtue whose object it is to render to every one what belongs to him, as nearly as may be, or that which governs contracts. To render commutative justice, the judge must make an equality between the parties, that no one may be a gainer by another's loss. Tr. Eq. 3.
     4. Toullier exposes the want of utility and exactness in this division of distributive and commutative justice, adopted in the compendium or abridgments of the ancient doctors, and prefers the division of internal and external justice; the first being a conformity of our will, and the latter a conformity of our actions to the law: their union making perfect justice. Exterior justice is the object of jurisprudence; interior justice is the object of morality. Dr. Civ. Fr. tit. prel. n. 6 et 7.
     5. According to the Frederician code, part 1, book 1, tit. 2, s. 27, justice consists simply in letting every one enjoy the rights which he has acquired in virtue of the laws. And as this definition includes all the other rules of right, there is properly but one single general rule of right, namely, Give every one his own. See, generally, Puffend. Law of Nature and Nations, B. 1, c. 7, s. 89; Elementorum Jurisprudentiae Universalis, lib. 1, definito, 17, 3, 1; Geo. Lib. 2, c. 11, s. 3; Ld. Bac. Read. Stat. Uses, 306; Treatise of Equity, B. 1, c. 1, s. 1.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other parliamentary and municipal candidates have strongly condemned such practices and expressed solidarity with Mr Al Dhaen, calling for those responsible to be brought to justice to prevent a repeat of such futile acts, reports our sister paper Akhbar Al Khaleej.
Lord Toby Harris, chairman of the National Trading Standards Board, said: "Now that one of the many individuals who've been operating this scam has been brought to justice, it's a stark warning to anyone else still doing it that they can be caught and will be prosecuted."
"It's so important to me that George's killers are brought to justice.
The British High Commission in its press release said that it was deeply disappointed that trial proceedings have not yet commenced and continues to call for the perpetrators of this terrible crime to be brought to justice. As well as being important for Mr Shaikh's family, justice being done will bring some assurance and peace of mind for other British tourists who visit Sri Lanka each year.
Police have also succeeded in arresting six terrorists involved in attacks on security patrols in Sr on April 18, 2013, while their accomplices are being tracked down to be brought to justice. Another terrorist wanted for justice was also arrested on April 20, 2013 at his house located in Nabih Saleh and referred to the Public Prosecution for legal action.
Ali Nasrallah were brought to justice. Nasrallah, who was killed during an altercation with the Jaafar clan last week, was laid to rest in his hometown of Shmestar in the Baalbek region over the weekend.
As Israel has tragically once more been a target of terrorism, the United States reaffirms our unshakeable commitment to Israel's security, and our deep friendship and solidarity with the Israeli people."In a separate statement, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said "the United States stands ready to offer any assistance necessary, and we will work with our partners in Bulgaria, Israel and elsewhere so that the perpetrators can be apprehended swiftly and brought to justice for this appalling crime."
AaAaAa The individual, in his fifties, was arrested and brought to justice for investigation.
Summary: Police officers have condemned a deal with Libya that means the killer of PC Yvonne Fletcher will never be brought to justice in Britain.
Summary: Negotiations for the release of a Dutch couple kidnapped by Yemeni tribesmen were stalled as kidnappers' demanded that some police officers must be brought to justice, tribal mediators said
I READ with absolute dismay the Brought to Justice column recently concerning a prolific criminal.
Pope Benedict XVI on Saturday expressed deep sorrow for young Australian victims of sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic Church clergy and called for those responsible to be brought to justice.