brought to trial

brought to trial

v. the act of actually beginning a trial, usually signaled by swearing in the first witness. (Not the impanelling of the jury or beginning opening statements).

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in classic literature ?
When the Stranger with a Club was brought to trial, the complainant said to the Judge:
But, though the Doctor tried hard, and never ceased trying, to get Charles Darnay set at liberty, or at least to get him brought to trial, the public current of the time set too strong and fast for him.
In our day the accused is usually a human being, or a socialist, but in mediaeval times, animals, fishes, reptiles and insects were brought to trial. A beast that had taken human life, or practiced sorcery, was duly arrested, tried and, if condemned, put to death by the public executioner.
My poor afflicted governess was now as much concerned as I, and a great deal more truly penitent, though she had no prospect of being brought to trial and sentence.
She was put in jail and brought to trial. The man testified to the facts.
I was put in irons, brought to trial again, and sent for life.
At daybreak the culprit was brought to trial, and promptly convicted.
That stern man had died in prison before his accusers could agree upon the charges by which he was to be brought to trial.
Pennifeather, amid the loud execrations of all Rattleborough, was brought to trial at the next criminal sessions, when the chain of circumstantial evidence(strengthened as it was by some additional damning facts, which Mr.
"Do you mean that you could have saved John Cavendish from being brought to trial?"
A time arrives when the representative of timocracy has a son: at first he begins by emulating his father and walking in his footsteps, but presently he sees him of a sudden foundering against the State as upon a sunken reef, and he and all that he has is lost; he may have been a general or some other high officer who is brought to trial under a prejudice raised by informers, and either put to death, or exiled, or deprived of the privileges of a citizen, and all his property taken from him.
Thus at the very moment that we thought that all was safe we were all four seized and brought to trial on a charge of murder,--three of us because we had held the gate that night, and the fourth because he was known to have been in the company of the murdered man.