burke


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burke

to murder in such a way as to leave no marks on the body, usually by suffocation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Burke described his father as "a self-made type of guy but not very touchy-feely.
The Sterling Professor of English at Yale University informs us that "no historian today would repeat the commonplace that Burke was the father of modern conservatism.
If you are not a Burke scholar, Russell Kirk's book, Edmund Burke: A Genius Reconsidered, must be read first.
Drew Maciag and Jesse Norman approach Burke in quite disparate ways.
political context, with its heavy emphasis on individual rights and autonomy--a stance that Burke criticized as a fundamental error which, along with an over-emphasis on rationality, inevitably led to the horrors of the French Revolution.
Among Burke Lift features is a one-clutch system, which allows for the elimination of switching between 4/5-ton and 8/10-ton devices.
Burke was among a group of 10 people who then surrounded the guard and punched him, Highbury magistrates court heard.
The main presence in Burke's criticism is Aristotle, and Burke often wrestles with the Aristotelian question of the priority of plot over character.
A discussion on breakfast radio last year asked 'is Brian Burke a one-off phenomenon or is he simply a product of our system of politics?
I felt at the time I had beenaRangers player, but not been a successful Rangers player because I had not really won anything," said Burke.
Thus, Burke's analysis of Marc Anthony's "Friends, Romans, countrymen" speech in Julius Caesar in "Antony on Behalf of the Play" (originally published in The Southern Review in 1935) shows Burke moving from a formally mediated but "aesthetically isolated" concept of audience, governed by strategies directed at a listener internal to a text, to a more expansive one including "anyone who should be concerned about understanding demagoguery in demagogic times"--what Burke himself calls in the essay "the grim intentions of the mob" (xxiv; 47).
Even readers already persuaded of Burke's considerable and accurate knowledge of India and France, or already convinced that Burke was driven to challenge Hastings and the French revolutionaries more by principles than by personal or political self-interest, will find much here to reinforce and enlarge their views.