burn

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burn

verb blaze, blister, brand, burn to a cinder, burst into flame, catch fire, cauterize, char, conflagrate, consume, cremate, deflagrate, enkindle, fire, flame up, flare, gut, ignite, incandesce, incendiarize, incinerate, inflame, kindle, light up, melt, overheat, parch, relume, scald, scorch, scorify, sear, seethe, singe, sizzle, smelt, smolder, strike a light, vesicate
Associated concepts: arson, revocation of wills
See also: consume, deflagrate, destroy, efface, expend
References in periodicals archive ?
"Much of the [1910] area was burned a second time in the succeeding series of bad fire years." early forester Elers Koch noted in his memoirs.
"It's still too soon to say with any certainty whether burned areas trigger more precipitation from storms," Jarrett said, "but it's definitely worth studying because of the future potential for flooding in communities near forest fires."
* Wenatchee National Forest, Washington: Assistant fire-management officer Michelle Ellis reports that previous prescribed burns helped to protect a number of homes from last summer's devastating Tyee Creek incident, a lightning-caused blaze that burned 140,000 acres east of the Cascades.
As the acres burned in these bad years rose steadily, however, fire-suppression costs (here shown in constant dollars) seemed to hit a plateau in 1992.
In one case, extreme winds descending from a thunderstorm blew across the A-rock blaze with gusts of 60 miles per hour, propelling a crown fire through 2,000 acres of forest that had previously burned during prescribed fires.
Meanwhile, the Nature Conservancy is leading the way in prescribed burning by a private organization--more than 9,000 acres burned in the U.S.
By contrast, even in the conflagrated year of 1988, with mass fires not only in Yellowstone but throughout the Rockies, only 7.4 million acres burned in the U.S.--twice as much as in some recent years, but only a quarter of what was destroyed during a typical war year.
Only a tiny portion of the forest, less than 1 percent of the area burned, suffered intensely hot ground fires that severely damaged the soil, says John Varley, head of research at Yellowstone.
JNF Ranger Lewis Smith documented two major fires on the Glenwood Ranger District--in 1930 and 1942--that each burned a couple thousand acres of forest land.
The United States watched in horror as its oldest and arguably most beloved national park burned.
When the flames of the Nature Center's first fire reached the trail fireline, they completely burned themselves out.
Now, evidence indicates that months after the flames are gone, the burned soil continues to emit high levels of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O).