Butt

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BUTT. A measure of capacity, equal to one hundred and eight gallons. See Measure.

References in classic literature ?
Hetty blushed a deep rose-colour when Captain Donnithorne entered the dairy and spoke to her; but it was not at all a distressed blush, for it was inwreathed with smiles and dimples, and with sparkles from under long, curled, dark eyelashes; and while her aunt was discoursing to him about the limited amount of milk that was to be spared for butter and cheese so long as the calves were not all weaned, and a large quantity but inferior quality of milk yielded by the shorthorn, which had been bought on experiment, together with other matters which must be interesting to a young gentleman who would one day be a landlord, Hetty tossed and patted her pound of butter with quite a self-possessed, coquettish air, slyly conscious that no turn of her head was lost.
"A rolling-pin and butter! Oh, my poor son Thomas!" exclaimed Tabitha, wringing her paws.
"And begad, so 't have!" said the dairyman, who held in his left hand a wooden slice on which a lump of butter was stuck.
When it is done, remove it; blow off all the ashes but one layer; butter that one and eat.
And everybody runs to see, and she snatches off my hat, and out comes the bread and what was left of the butter, and she grabbed me, and hugged me, and says:
The old lady was glad to meet the little girl and gave her a slice of white bread and butter which had been used as a door-mat.
`It was the BEST butter,' the March Hare meekly replied.
"I don't mind about the butter," she said, "and I--I'm sorry he hurt you!" And she tried to shake hands with the little ruffian: but Uggug only blubbered louder, and wouldn't make friends.
'If you do such a thing again, I'll have you buttered! It went through and through my head like an earthquake!'
She sat down and proceeded to cut bread and butter. It amused Philip to see that she treated her husband as though he were a child.
The milk was good for Pavel, who was often sick, and he could make butter by beating sour cream with a wooden spoon.
Their way of dressing their meat, an European, till he hath been long accustomed to it, can hardly be persuaded to like; everything they eat smells strong and swims with butter. They make no use of either linen or plates.