bye-law


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bye-law

a rule promulgated by some body other than Parliament that has effect if done in pursuance and within the limits of some higher authorization such as an Act of Parliament.
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VimpelCom Ltd (Nasdaq:VIP), an integrated telecommunications services operator, announced on Wednesday that at its Special General Meeting (SGM) of shareholders held on Wednesday, the company's shareholders have approved amended and restated bye-laws with technical amendments to the company's former bye-laws.
The bye-laws will also prohibit the consumption of alcohol, overnight camping and the lighting of fires and barbecues, dangerous driving, littering and flytipping.
When presenting the proposal, chief bye-law officer, Phemelo Matome revealed that they came up with the guidelines because they experienced some challenges during festivals.
He added the draft bye-law as presented creates a health and safety issue "as it is not safe to stand in a grave without supporting sidewalls".
The Tay Salmon District Fishery Board applied to Perth and Kinross Council for a bye-law to restrict commercial rafting to three days a week to help beats recover.
Lord Colin Moynihan, the BOA chairman, said: "We would vigorously defend any legal challenge to the anti-doping bye-law.
He said a bye-law wasn't possible because - unlike private hire firms - taxi firms don't have to licence their call centres.
The Lake District has a long association with power boating, and enthusiasts claim the new bye-law on Windermere is a denial of the heritage founded on the exploits of land and water speed record holder Donald Campbell.
It added the offence took place on December 3, 2010, almost a full month after the amendment to the bye-law had been passed.
The casual vacancy will be until the close of the AGM 2012, as prescribed by bye-law 39(b).
Parts of the city centre are currently covered by a bye-law giving police power to control drinking of alcohol in the streets.
In 1898 a bye-law confronted some of these problems by forbidding residents from emptying their chamber pots on the road and from shaking their rugs or mats on the highway.