CD

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Related to cadmium: Cadmium chloride, Cadmium oxide, Cadmium Plating, Cadmium poisoning

certificate of deposit (CD)

n. a document issued by a bank in return for a deposit of money which pays a fixed interest rate for a specified period (from a month to several years). Interest rates on CD's are usually higher than savings accounts because banking institutions require a commitment to leave money in the CD for a fixed period of time. Often there is a financial penalty (fee) for cashing in a CD before the pledged time runs out.

References in periodicals archive ?
There is no legal basis for keeping or allowing new cadmium displays in the market.
In addition, the mice receiving 40 [micro]M/kg of cadmium died before 48 hr and this dose was considered a lethal dose and was excluded from the study.
Figure 1 shows lead and cadmium content as measured by XRF of individual nonvinyl samples sorted by color.
The arithmetic mean of cadmium content (milligrams per 100 g prepared weight) of all available samples of each food was assigned as the cadmium content for that food.
Samples of gill, liver and muscle tissues were taken for determination of cadmium concentration in the respective tissues.
Use exhaust ventilation to capture cadmium dust at its source.
The lead and cadmium removal decreased gradually following the rise of pH from 7.
The objective of this study was to examine the effects of exposure of Crassostrea virginica to concentrations of cadmium representative of those found in polluted aquatic habitats on the activity of enzymes involved in the processing of the microalgae that comprise the primary food of filter-feeding bivalves.
Cadmium affects how the DNA in cells is tagged or marked by a methyl group, a process that can alter the way the genes are read and expressed, researchers wrote in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.
Cigarette smoke is the most common source of exposure to cadmium, with smokers estimated to have twice the levels of cadmium as non-smokers.
Cadmium occurs at low concentrations naturally, but scientists are concerned because contamination of farmland mainly due to atmospheric deposition and use of fertilizers leads to higher uptake in plants.
It is estimated that about 20 tons of cadmium were leaked into the river.