call

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Related to calls into question: bent on, run by, stick with, in line with, plugging along, turns out

Call

To convoke or summon by public announcement; to request the appearance and participation of several people—such as a call of a jury to serve, a roll call, a call of public election, or a call of names of the members of a legislative body.

In contract law, the demand for the payment of money according to the contract terms, usually by formal notice.

As applied to corporation law, the demand of the board of directors that subscribers pay an installment or portion of the amount that is still owed on shares that they have agreed to buy. A call price is the price paid by a corporation for the redemption of its own Securities.

In securities, a contract that gives a person the right to demand payment of a certain specified number of shares of stock at a stated price or upon a fixed date.

call

n. the demand by a corporation that a stockholder pay an installment or assessment on shares already owned.

call

1 a demand by a company on shareholders to pay all or part of the subscription price of the shares not already paid.
2 to admit, in the sense of a barrister being called to the BAR.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study calls into question the use of estrogen replacement strictly as a cardiovascular aid to lower LDL cholesterol in women with the larger form of LDL, or pattern A, he says.
This suggests that cow's milk "is not associated with beta-cell autoimmunity," the researchers say, adding that the result "calls into question the importance of cow's milk avoidance as a preventive measure for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus."
The work calls into question suggestions that the great ice sheet shriveled during a warm episode in the recent geologic past, says Davida Kellogg.
It also calls into question the family tree outlining the heredity of several hard-to-classify algae.
Podrid of the Boston University School of Medicine calls the study's results "depressing." However, he told SCIENCE NEWS, "I don't think it calls into question the value of CPR.
While work by Parker and his colleagues calls into question the evidence for an additional force -- thought to be about one-fiftieth the strength of gravity -- it does not completely discredit the experiments.
Rather, he says, it calls into question the no-threshold theory -- because if there is not threshold, average county measurements should correlate directly with observed lung-cancer incidence.