cap


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cap

n. slang for maximum, as the most interest that can be charged on an "adjustable rate" promissory note.

cap

noun ceiling, greatest amount, lid, limit, maxiium amount

cap

verb complete, conclude, end, finish, finish off, get done, get through with, perfect, terminate
See also: culminate, culmination, finish, pinnacle, surpass

CAP

abbreviation for COMMON AGRICULTURAL POLICY.
References in classic literature ?
Quelala being the first owner of the Golden Cap," replied the Monkey, "he was the first to lay his wishes upon us.
This was all we ever had to do until the Golden Cap fell into the hands of the Wicked Witch of the West, who made us enslave the Winkies, and afterward drive Oz himself out of the Land of the West.
Nobody chose the subject; it all came out of Dodo's cap.
Cadwallader was gone, Celia said privately to Dorothea, "Really, Dodo, taking your cap off made you like yourself again in more ways than one.
All present laughed at the number of caps and the novelty of the suit; Sancho set himself to think for a moment, and then said, "It seems to me that in this case it is not necessary to deliver long-winded arguments, but only to give off-hand the judgment of an honest man; and so my decision is that the tailor lose the making and the labourer the cloth, and that the caps go to the prisoners in the gaol, and let there be no more about it.
Almost every time a new carriage drove up a whisper ran through the crowd and caps were doffed.
He wore what appeared to be a woolen cap, and, still more alarming, of a most sanguinary red.
They found the doctor seated in his little study, clad in his dark camlet[1] robe of knowledge, with his black velvet cap, after the manner of Boerhaave,[2] Van Helmont,[3] and other medical sages, a pair of green spectacles set in black horn upon his clubbed nose, and poring over a German folio that reflected back the darkness of his physiognomy.
The doctor had been no less carefully armed and accoutered by his housekeeper, the vigilant Frau Ilsy, and sallied forth in his camlet robe by way of surcoat,[1] his black velvet cap under his cocked hat, a thick clasped book under his arm, a basket of drugs and dried herbs in one hand, and in the other the miraculous rod of divination.
He turned himself sideways to the carriage, and leaned back, with his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow.
The accursed was already under the carriage with some half-dozen particular friends, pointing out the chain with his blue cap.
When the professor enters a beer-hall in the evening where students are gathered together, these rise up and take off their caps, and invite the old gentleman to sit with them and partake.