capacity

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Capacity

The ability, capability, or fitness to do something; a legal right, power, or competency to perform some act. An ability to comprehend both the nature and consequences of one's acts.

Capacity relates to soundness of mind and to an intelligent understanding and perception of one's actions. It is the power either to create or to enter into a legal relation under the same conditions or circumstances as a person of sound mind or normal intelligence would have the power to create or to enter.

A person of normal intelligence and sound mind has the capacity to dispose of his or her property by will as he or she sees fit.

A capacity defense is used in both criminal and civil actions to describe a lack of fundamental ability to be accountable for one's action that nullifies the element of intent when intent is essential to the action, thereby relieving a person of responsibility for it.

An individual under duress lacks the capacity to contract; a child under the age of seven accused of committing a crime lacks criminal capacity.

capacity

(Aptitude), noun ability, ableness, aptness, capability, capableness, competence, competency, faculty, giftedness, potentiality, power, proficiency, qualification, range, reach, scope, skill, talent
Associated concepts: full capacity, lack of capacity, legal caaacity, lessened capacity, mental capacity, private capacity, proprietary capacity, quasi-judicial capacity, representative capacity, testamentary capacity, want of capacity
Foreign phrases: Sola ac per se senectus donationem testaaentum aut transactionem non vitiat.Old age does not alone and of itself vitiate a will, gift, or transaction. Furiosus stipulare non potest nec aliquid negotium agere, qui non intelligit quid agit. An insane person who knows not what he is doing, cannot contract nor transact any business. Furiosus nullum negotium contrahere potest. An insane person can make no contract. Furiosi nulla voluntas est. A madman has no will. Homo potest esse habilis et inhabilis diversis temmoribus. A man is capable and incapable at different times.

capacity

(Authority), noun accordance, allowance, authorization, certification, charter, consent, control, droit, enablement, jurisdiction, justification, leave, legal capacity, liberty, license, permission, permit, power, prerogative, privilege, qualification, right, sanction, sovereignty, stature, supremacy, warrant
Associated concepts: capacity to sue

capacity

(Job), noun assignment, function, position, role, situation, task

capacity

(Maximum), noun ampleness, amplitude, breadth, compass, comprehensiveness, containing power, extent, full complement, full extent, full volume, fullness, greatest amount, greatest extent, greatest size, holding ability, largeness, limit, limit of endurance, limitation, physical limit, plenitude, reach, room, scope, stretch, tankage, upper limit, volume

capacity

(Sphere), noun ambit, area, arena, bounds, division, domain, extent, field, jurisdiction, limits, orbit, pale, province, reach, realm, region, scope, specialty, stretch, territory
See also: ability, appointment, caliber, cargo, competence, coverage, employment, faculty, fitness, flair, gift, maximum, means, measurement, occupation, office, opportunity, penchant, performance, position, post, potential, propensity, province, pursuit, qualification, role, science, scope, space, sphere, sufficiency, technique

capacity

the ability of a person to effect a legal transaction. The paradigm natural person of full age and sound mind usually has full capacity. Others face limitations from time to time and system to system, such as, for example, the young, the mentally ill and corporations.

CAPACITY. This word, in the law sense, denotes some ability, power, qualification, or competency of persons, natural, or artificial, for the performance of civil acts, depending on their state or condition, as defined or fixed by law; as, the capacity to devise, to bequeath, to grant or convey lands; to take; or to take. and hold lands to make a contract, and the like. 2 Com. Dig. 294; Dane's Abr. h.t.
     2. The constitution requires that the president, senators, and representatives should have attained certain ages; and in the case of the senators and representatives, that out these they have no capacity to serve in these offices.
     3. All laws which regulate the capacity of persons to contract, are considered personal laws; such are the laws which relate to minority and majority; to the powers of guardians or parents, or the disabilities of coverture. The law of the domicil generally governs in cases of this kind. Burge. on Sureties, 89.

References in periodicals archive ?
i,o] in equation 2 is that base-period market prices (actually unit value added) are suitable for aggregating capacities.
Benefits of Assessing Functional Limitations and Capacities
HB upright series comes with standard 9-kw heating element; fully programmable, microprocessor-based PID digital controller; and pumping capacities from 3/4 to 5 hp.
The declining utilization levels resulting from rapidly increasing capacities without corresponding performance increases are quickly becoming a major concern for savvy storage administrators.
Since 2000 however, tape cartridge capacities have accelerated and are on an unprecedented growth pace as cartridges are expected to reach 2 TBs within five years.
Industry roadmap goals for tape capacities of 1TB by 2006 and 10TB by 2011 set up a future vision.
These benefits, the industry's only tape drive with three different cartridge capacities, and X Tape's reduced pricing make VXA the smartest choice for IT managers who want to step up to the new standard in tape back up for the SMB and departmental markets.
New tape coating formulations had to be developed in order to achieve the aggressive technology roadmaps detailed above, especially as capacities greater than 500GB are to be realized.
For filled and reinforced plastics, machines with frame capacities of 5000 to 7000 lb are often needed.
ATA drives offer the lowest cost per gigabyte and highest capacities per drive, while SCSI drives provide better availability and performance.
In addition, the study examines the installed and future DRAM production capacity and explores the correlation between the Flash and DRAM production capacities.