capital

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capital

1) n. from Latin for caput, meaning "head," the basic assets of a business (particularly corporations or partnerships) or of an individual, including actual funds, equipment and property as distinguished from stock in trade, inventory, payroll, maintenance and services. 2) adj. related to the basic assets or activities of a business or individual, such as capital account, capital assets, capital expenditure, and capital gain or loss. 3) n. an amount of money a person owns, as in "how much capital do you have to put into this investment?" as distinguished from the amount which must be financed. (See: capital account, capital assets, capital gains or losses, stock in trade)

capital

noun assets, available means, balances, bank annuities, belongings, caput, cash supplies, credits, economic resources, finances, financial provision, financial resources, funds, funds for investment, funds in hand, holdings, income, investment portfolio, investments, line of credit, liquid assets, money, pecuniary resources, property, ready cash, receipts, reserves, resources, revenue, savings, sors, working assets
Associated concepts: authorized capital, capital account, capital assets, capital budget, capital case, capital construccion, capital contribution, capital crime, capital expenditure, capital gains, capital gains tax, capital improvement, capiial in a corporation, capital investment, capital loss, capital of a state, capital offense, capital outlay, capital paid-in, capital project, capital punishment, capital reserve, capital stock, capital surplus, circulating capital, distribution of capptal, equity capital, fixed capital, floating capital, impairrent of capital, reduction of capital, return of capital, stated capital, working capital
Foreign phrases: Excusat aut extenuat delictum in capitallbus quod non operatur idem in civilibus.That excuses or extenuates a wrong in capital cases which would not have the same effect in civil suits.
See also: assets, basic, cardinal, cash, central, deadly, essential, fund, important, leading, master, material, monetary, money, possessions, premium, prime, principal, resource, salient, seat, securities, security, select, share, stellar, stock, substance, treasury

CAPITAL, political economy, commerce. In political economy, it is that portion of the produce of a country, which may be made directly available either to support the human species or to the facilitating of production.
     2. In commerce, as applied to individuals, it is those objects, whether consisting of money or other property, which a merchant, trader, or other person adventures in an undertaking, or which he contributes to the common stock of a partnership. 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1458.
     3. It signifies money put out at interest.
     4. The fund of a trading company or corporation is also called capital, but in this sense the word stock is generally added to it; thus we say the capital stock of the Bank of North America.

References in periodicals archive ?
A Foodie's Guide to Capitalism is not shy in its criticism of "business as usual" capitalism, and encourages the reader to think long and hard about alternatives to unfettered capitalism that could lend more power to small farmers, to impoverished populations, and to ordinary consumers.
Almost out of nowhere, he concludes about how the Left's academics and politicians must develop an alternative police science in order to use policing and security to make a transition from capitalism to socialism.
Lady Lynn Forester de Rothschild, the CEO and founder of the Coalition for Inclusive Capitalism, says, We are pleased to share the findings from the Conference on Inclusive Capitalism poll, presented by EY, with the worldwide business community and the public.
Some of the English titles are, "The Transformation of Politicised Religion: From Zealots into Leaders" (2015), "Bureaucratic, Societal, and Ethical Transformation of the Former East Germany" (2004), "Globalisation Between A Convoy Model and An Underconsumptionist Threat' (2006), "Saving Capitalism from the Capitalists: World Capitalism and Global History" (1) (2003), "Development and Underdevelopment: The History, Economics, and Politics of North-South Relations" (1991), and "Governing Development Across Cultures: Challenges and Dilemmas of an Emerging Sub-Discipline in Political Science" (2006).
And, for a synthesis of both the moral and the practical arguments for capitalism, I recommend George Reisman's magnum opus Capitalism.
One concerns the goal of strategies responding to the harms of capitalism: strategies can either envision transcending the structures of capitalism or simply neutralizing the worst harms of capitalism.
By that measure, the descent of capitalism from its zenith began long ago," they wrote.
Consider these attempts and so-called newfangled forms of capitalism: Compassionate Capitalism, Inclusive Capitalism, Humane Capitalism, Humanistic Capitalism, Healthy Capitalism and Neo-Capitalism.
Saving Capitalism from the capitalist by Hartmut Elsenhans argues that a lack of perception of the progressive aspects of capitalism has resulted into policy measures that have frequently been defeated.
I leave my read of the book convinced that Weber got it wrong, and that capitalism was born elsewhere, though Calvinism may have enlivened it at the time and place discussed in The Protestant Ethic.
Exactly how this economic reformation should be implemented is a question that sparks debates across the ideological spectrum, but the idea that capitalism can be reformed is accepted by the left, right, and libertarians alike.