carcass

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Item Nutritional plans (1) 1 2 3 4 5 CV % Initial weight, kg 23.4 23.1 23.4 23.6 23.8 -- Final weight, kg 104.0 107.8 105.3 108.7 108.0 4.80 Feed intake, g 2225 2228 2190 2265 2232 6.36 [dia.sup.-1] Weight gain, g 916 963 931 967 956 4,72 [dia.sup.-1] Feed conversion 2.43 2.32 2.35 2.34 2.33 4.59 Carcass traits Carcass yield, kg 73.6 74.1 73.2 75.7 73.7 7.47 Meat amount, kg 41.7 41.6 41.2 43.5 42.4 9.18 Meat yield, % 56.6 56.1 56.9 57.5 57.5 3.89 Backfat thickness, 13.4 12.5 12.8 12.6 11.6 18.69 mm (1) Nutritional plans: 1 = 0.90-0.80-0.70, 2 = 1.00-0.90-0.80, 3 = 1.10-1.00-0.90, 4 = 1.20-1.10-1.00, and 5 = 1.30-1.20-1.10% SIDL fed to gilts from 60 to 99, 100 to 129, and 130 to 148 days of age, respectively.
The carcass without giblets was weighed, expressed as a percentage of its live weight and considered as the carcass yield. In addition, the weight of the liver (without gall bladder), gizzard and proventriculus, heart, spleen, bursa of fabricius, small intestine, the two caeca, and visible fat (around the viscera, gizzard, and subcutaneously) was recorded and its relation to the live BW of the bird, in percentage, was calculated.
The broilers subjected to treatment 3 (basal feed without growth promoter + [beta]-mannanase) had the best carcass yield (89.79%), while those with treatment 2 (basal feed without growth promoter) had the lowest carcass yield (88.70%).
5% of the average weight of the experimental unit) were sacrificed to obtain the carcass yield, prime cuts and organs.
When the animals present similar slaugther weight, differences at the carcass weight are the result of differences at carcass yield. Hot carcass yield (HCY) was higher (P=0.0594) for the animals submitted to the high level of concentrate during finishing phase when compared to medium level (50.16 vs 48.62%).
Similarities in the quantitative characteristics of carcasses may be due to similar weight of animals at slaughter since traits are greatly related (Arboitte et al., 2004) when carcass yield is not affected.
Furthermore, Sales (2014) stated that the length of the trials and the outside conditions could explain 9% of the heterogeneity obtained in carcass yield. Finally, the organ characteristic values obtained in the present study were in line with the findings documented by Muriel and Pascual (1995) regarding chickens reared on a free-range.
Despite the differences in intake and digestibility of nutrients, this was not reflected in the growth performance of the animals, since the average daily gain, carcass yield and feed conversion were similar, regardless of diet (Table 6).
However, WDG 15 showed the highest percentage of A-grade frequencies (30%) for carcass yield grade (A:B:C, %) and WDG 28 showed 15% of A-grade.
There were no significant differences between treatments (p > 0.05) in carcass yield, breast yield, thigh + drumstick yield, wing yield, or back yield of broiler chickens at 42 days of age (Table 4).