murmur

(redirected from cardiac murmur)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cardiac murmur: tachycardia, Heart sounds
See: speak

murmur

formerly, to defame a judge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the 19 children seen as outpatients, 15 (78.9%) had chronic cardiac failure and 18 (94.7%) a cardiac murmur.
Values show the percentage and absolute number of patients with this comorbidity requiring outpatient clinic assessment Patients requiring OPD assessment Diminished exercise tolerance * 100% (24) Cardiac implants 100% (8) Gastric banding 100% (9) Angina 87% (15) Previous regional block complication 83% (6) COAD 76% (25) Hepatitis 75% (12) OSA 72% (49) Orthopnoea 71% (17) DVT 70% (20) Cardiac murmur 70% (10) OPD=outpatient department, COAD=chronic obstructive airway disease, OSA=obstructive sleep apnoea, DVT=deep vein thrombosis.
(21) evaluated 2,547 schoolchildren in terms of cardiac murmurs and reported a frequency of undiagnosed CHD of 0.3% and of rheumatic heart disease of 0.11%.
"Looking around," he is told of an ideal teaching subject for his neophytes: a loud cardiac murmur caused by a defective valve in a 43-year-old man awaiting corrective surgery.
An 8-year-old Chinese female with a cardiac murmur was initially diagnosed as having a ventricular septal defect (VSD) in the local hospital.
The patient is a female of 14-year-old with body weight 44 kg, who was referred to our hospital for cardiac murmur and history of exercise intolerance and recurrent respiratory tract infections.
Diagnosis is based on the clinical suspicion of finding a cardiac murmur, congestive cardiac failure, poor pulses and cyanosis.
* Change in the cardiac murmur or signs of cardiac failure, such as crepitations at the lung bases or raised jugular venous pressure.
Underlying cardiac abnormalities, such as previous history of syncope, family history of sudden cardiac death, cardiac murmur, history of over-exhaustion post exercise and ventricular tachyarrhythmia during physical activity, are the main cause of unexpected death in athletes on field.
Finally, it is also possible that rates for congenital heart defects have been underestimated when echocardiography was performed only for infants with cardiac murmur. It is unknown whether different results in associated congenital heart defects were observed with routine echocardiography of all studied infants.
On the 7th hospital day, a cardiac murmur was detected on auscultation.