body

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Related to carotid body: aortic body, carotid body tumor

Body

The principal part of anything as distinguished from its subordinate parts, as in the main part of an instrument. An individual, an organization, or an entity given legal recognition, such as a corporation or "body corporate." A compilation of laws known as a "body of laws."

body

(Collection), noun aggregation, assemblage, batch, colligation, community, company, compilation, congeries, conglomeration, entity, gathering, host, mass, multitude, plenum, polity, sodality, troupe, wholeness
Associated concepts: body corporate, body politic, governnental body, reviewing body

body

(Main part), noun core, corpus, essential part, figure, form, greater part, hub, main part, major part, principal part, shape, structure, substance
Associated concepts: body of an instrument

body

(Person), noun anatomy, cadaver, carcass, carrion, corporality, corporalness, corporeality, corpse, corpus, entity, human being, material existence, physical being, physique
Associated concepts: body attachment, body execution, body heirs
See also: aggregate, assemblage, assembly, band, bulk, character, committee, community, compact, confederacy, configuration, content, cornerstone, corporation, corpse, corpus, entity, form, generality, individual, majority, mass, materiality, party, society, structure, substance, weight

BODY. A person.
     2. In practice, when the sheriff returns cepi corpus to a capias, the plaintiff may obtain a rule, before special bail has been entered, to bring in the body and this must be done either by committing the defendant or entering special bail. See Dead Body.

References in periodicals archive ?
Carotid body tumors develop on both sides of the neck in the same rate, in both females and males.
The carotid body tumor resection surgery requires adequate monitorization for cerebral ischemia and signs of hemodynamic and respiratory events.
It is demonstrated that chronic exposure to hypoxia is responsible of a compensatory hypertrophy of carotid body and some studies have shown that long exposure to high altitudes appears to be correlated with a 10-fold higher incidence of carotid body tumors but no increase in the incidence of paragangliomas located in other sites has been reported.
Our modulation of the carotid body - a key chemosensor located at the fork of the carotid artery that helps regulate respiratory activity - is a breakthrough innovation based on extensive studies and a deep understanding of the interdependence of the body's various systems.
INTRODUCTION: Carotid body was first described by von Haller in 1743.
Since chronically hypoxic patients often develop paragangliomas arising from the carotid body, a critical site of oxygen sensing, activation of hypoxia-inducible pathways appears to be essential to the pathogenesis of these tumors and may greatly contribute to their hypervascularity.
1) The carotid body is the most common site for these tumours to arise, and these carotid body tumours characteristically splay the internal and external carotid arteries.
Cardiovascular/Peripheral Vascular Surgery: Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy; Aortic Aneurysm Repair - Criteria and Options; Aortic and/or valve replacement; Atherectomy, peripheral; Atrial septal defect, repair; Carotid body tumor resection (Glomectomy); Carotid endarterectomy - Indications, LOS; Carotid/Vertebral Artery Angioplasty and Stenting Procedures; Coronary artery bypass graft(s) surgery (CABG) - Indications, LOS; Extracranial-Intracranial arterial bypass surgery; Heart volume reduction surgery;
In one study an attempt was made to determine the importance of carotid body chemoreceptors in control of cardiovascular response to acute hypoxia.
2) When they do occur in the head and neck, the most common locations are the carotid body at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery (carotid body tumor), the jugular bulb (glomus jugulare), the tympanic plexus (glomus tympanicum), and the vagus nerve ganglia (glomus vagale).