case system


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case system

n. the method of studying law generally used in American law schools, in which the students read, outline (brief) the cases, discuss and hear lectures about the cases. Each case presented stands for a particular rule of law in the subject matter covered and is contained in "casebooks" on particular topics (contracts, torts, criminal law, constitutional law, agency, etc.). The system is useful since it relates the law to real and factual situations which assists students in memorization and encourages deductive reasoning. The case system is reinforced by textbooks and outlines on the subject matter, which were formerly the principal sources of learning. The method was introduced first at Harvard in 1869 by professor Christopher C. Langdell and soon became standard.

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Tank also is an attorney and advocate for children in the foster case system, working with Court-Appointed Special Advocates of DuPage County.
Introduced in 2015, the Digital Case System is used in crown courts across England and Wales.
The recorder also said that the sentence was being reduced because of the delay, plus their mitigation "which I've read in documents uploaded to the digital case system" and because of their guilty pleas.
A new variant I discovered is the uniVERSE Case System, featuring a slim, protective OtterBox case with a modular rail mount on the back that allows the attachment of a variety of accessories.