casuistry


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casuistry

noun behaviorism, deontology, ethical philosophy, ethology, idealism, moral science, perfectionism, sophistry, utilitarianism
See also: duplicity, ethics, sophistry
References in periodicals archive ?
The introductory chapter reviews the history of casuistry in Spain and the impact of the Order of Jesus on the education of playwrights and school drama, one of the bastions in the development of the comedia in Spain and the New World.
Drawing cursorily from Aquinas and defining prudence as the choosing of right ends and right means, he develops a rudimentary casuistry that, in conjunction with a tendentious historical argument, provides a tidy theory for action.
People tell me that I should fly to Stansted for a quid or something, but the quid fare is yet another casuistry.
The concept of the lesser evil plays three roles in Ignatieff's account: in casuistry, moral psychology, and politics.
On the other hand, another type of mind, shrewder and keener and more tortuous too, sees in the very strength of the anti-Negro movement its patent weaknesses, and with Jesuitic casuistry is deterred by no ethical considerations in the endeavour to turn this weakness to the black man's strength.
In the believer's world, the world of authentic piety, the mediations (the cosmology, casuistry, sacred writings, traditions of origin, institutional structure) are factually true.
The desperate casuistry that underlies such a proposal indicates the true dilemma of a civilisation placing increasing emphasis on its religiosity at the same time as its hi-tech capacities push back the bounds of nature's domain.
Anglo-Saxons like all of life's situations to be covered by a law; Italians prefer to keep things simple, with a few eternal and unchanging norms, and lots of room for casuistry.
Few realise (it is usually said to be anonymous) that the churchman Jeremy Taylor (1613-1667) in his Ductor Dubitantium 1:1:5, a compendium of Catholic and Protestant casuistry, traces it back to a couplet by Ambrose: 'Si fueris Romae, Romano vivite more; /Si fueris alibi, vivite sicut ubi.
Chapter 2 "Casuistry and Eidoloclasm," the last of the three added chapters, introduces a typical De Quinceyan turn toward ambiguous and threatening opposites: casuistry and eidoloclasm are "a negative inversion of 'Knowledge' and 'Power,'" used to evaluate (and attack) the reputations of Coleridge and Wordsworth (24).
Jeanne Shami takes up a defense of Donne's middle way as a form of casuistry that excludes extreme or exceptional cases and empties "controversial terms of their polemical baggage .
I will not attempt to hide my utter contempt for such casuistry, nor my shame that I work in an organisation where colleagues would resort to it to justify torture.