causal

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causal

adjective causative, compelling, conductive, constitutive, creative, determinant, determinative, effectual, formative, generating, generative, inception, inducing, influential, institutive, instrumental, originating, originative, productive
Associated concepts: causal connection, causal negligence, causal relationship
See also: causative
References in periodicals archive ?
By performing causal inference, decision makers can determine whether an intervention will effectively reduce the probability of delay incidents, thus increasing the probability of flight on-time performance.
In part, this has stemmed from the recognition that while experimental designs might improve the quality of causal inference in a given study, the use of experiments does not on its own offer any corrective to problems such as "publication bias"--the tendency of journals to publish only non-null results and therefore to reflect a biased sample of actual research results rather than the actual universe of findings in a given research area.
The four major threats to causal inferences that one must eliminate in this design include: selection-maturation, instrumentation, differential statistical regression, and local history.
However, causal inferences about the effectiveness of CBT could be strengthened in at least three ways.
He rejects the assertion that causation is merely a social construct, but acknowledges that a claim of causation requires an unprovable belief that causation exists and that causal inferences are partially subjective due to the plausibility criterion.
Reback's ability to draw causal inferences hinged on the likely assumption that schools with student enrollments just above a state-specified threshold are, on average, indistinguishable from those with student enrollments just below that threshold.
Matching as Non-parametric Preprocessing for Reducing Model Dependence in Parametric Causal Inference.
The consideration of these results can be useful to think about studies that explore what the role of these prosodic cues can be, for example, in the generation of causal inferences.
Studies on the role of working memory capacity in the making of causal inferences have focused on connective inferences (Singer, Andrusiak, Reisdorf, & Black, 1992; Singer & Ritchot, 1996) and predictive inferences (Calvo, 2001; 2004; Estevez & Calvo 2000, Linderholm, 2002).
In terms of causal inference, the likelihood that an inference is correctis the validity of the inference.
Brady and David Collier (2004), contains a broad spectrum of arguments in favor of distinct tools for generating causal inference in small-N studies.