caution


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caution

(Vigilance), noun attention, attentiveness, care, carefulness, cautio, circumspection, concern, consideration, cura, diligence, exactitude, forethought, guardedness, heed, heedfulness, meticulousness, mindfulness, prudence, prudentia, regard, thoroughness, wariness, watchfulness
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution

caution

(Warning), noun admonition, alarm, alert, augury, caveat, exhortation, foreboding, foretelling, monition, notice, omen, portent, precursor, presage, prognosis, prognostic
Associated concepts: cautionary instructions

caution

verb admonish, advise against, apprise, be vigilant, communicate to, counsel, dissuade, exhort, exhort to take heed, forearm, foreshow, forewarn, give advice, give fair warning, give intimation of impending evil, give notice, give warning, give warning of possible harm, inform, make aware, monere, notify of danger, persuade against, predict, prenotify, prepare for the worst, prescribe, prewarn, put on guard, remonstrate, serve notice, sound the alarm, spell danger, take precautions, urge, warn
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution, unusual caution
Foreign phrases: Abundans cautela non nocet.Extreme caution does no harm.
See also: admonish, admonition, advise, alert, care, castigate, caveat, charge, counsel, deliberation, deter, deterrent, diligence, discourage, discretion, dissuade, exhort, expostulate, forewarn, heed, hesitation, indicant, inform, monition, notice, notification, notify, portend, precaution, premonition, prudence, restraint, signify, warn, warning

caution

1 a formal warning given to a person suspected or accused of an offence that his words will be taken down and may be used in evidence.
2 a warning to a person by the police, or in Scotland by the Procurator Fiscal, that while it is considered that there is enough evidence for a prosecution, no such prosecution will take place but that the matter will be kept on file.
3 a notice entered on the register of title to land that prevents a proprietor from disposing of land without a notice to the person who entered the caution.
4 see GUARANTEE.

CAUTION. A term of the Roman civil law, which is used in various senses. It signifies, sometimes, security, or security promised. Generally every writing is called cautio, a caution by which any object is provided for. Vicat, ad verb. In the common law a distinction is made between a contract and the security. The contract may be good and the security void. The contract may be divisible, and the security entire and indivisible. 2 Burr, 1082. The securities or cautions judicially required of the defendant, are, judicio sisti, to attend and appear during the pendency of the suit; de rato, to confirm the acts of his attorney or proctor; judicium solvi, to pay the sum adjudged against him. Coop. Just. 647; Hall's Admiralty Practice, 12; 2 Brown, Civ. Law, 356.

CAUTION, TURATORY, Scotch law. Juratory caution is that which a suspender swears is the best he can offer in order to obtain a suspension. Where the suspender cannot, from his low or suspected circumstances, procure unquestionable security, juratory caution is admitted. Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. 4, 3, 6.

References in classic literature ?
It will not, I presume, have escaped observation, that it EXPRESSLY confines this supremacy to laws made PURSUANT TO THE CONSTITUTION; which I mention merely as an instance of caution in the convention; since that limitation would have been to be understood, though it had not been expressed.
On the last day of their march hunger got the better of their caution, and they shot a fine buffalo bull at the risk of being betrayed by the report.
how eloquent, at least, were her wishes on the side of early warm attachment, and a cheerful confidence in futurity, against that over-anxious caution which seems to insult exertion and distrust Providence
Allen made her way through the throng of men by the door, as swiftly as the necessary caution would allow; Catherine, however, kept close at her side, and linked her arm too firmly within her friend's to be torn asunder by any common effort of a struggling assembly.
Much in the same manner ought that oligarchy to be established which is next in order: but as to that which is most opposite to a pure democracy, and approaches nearest to a dynasty and a tyranny, as it is of all others the worst, so it requires the greatest care and caution to preserve it: for as bodies of sound and healthy constitutions and ships which are well manned and well found for sailing can bear many injuries without perishing, while a diseased body or a leaky ship with an indifferent crew cannot support the [1321a] least shock; so the worst-established governments want most looking after.
Denisov, not being a member of the family, did not understand Pierre's caution and being, as a malcontent, much interested in what was occurring in Petersburg, kept urging Pierre to tell them about what had happened in the Semenovsk regiment, then about Arakcheev, and then about the Bible Society.
Once, at a sharp turn where a man's shoulder would unavoidably brush against a screen of leaves, the bushman displayed great caution as he spread the leaves aside and exposed the head of a sharp-pointed spear, so set that the casual passer-by would receive at the least a nasty scratch.
He passed with great caution the door of the gnarled woman, and finally stopped outside his home and listened.
The other replied with greater caution, "But suppose the water should fail us.
One night a squadron of Federal horse commanded by Major Seidel, a gallant and skillful officer, moved out from Readyville on an uncommonly hazardous enterprise requiring secrecy, caution and silence.
Grewgious, with habitual caution, 'it might be well to see him, reverend sir, if you don't object.
If he overcame his shyness, caution applied the foot-brake.