Cede

(redirected from ceding)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to ceding: leaner, swayed, reassigned

Cede

To yield up; to assign; to grant; to surrender; to withdraw. Generally used to designate the transfer of territory from one government to another.

TO CEDE, civil law. To assign; to transfer; as, France ceded Louisiana to the United States.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Class 1 note is not attached until after the ceding insurer absorbs the first $230 million of losses and the Class 3 and Class 2 notes are wiped out.
The capital requirement to settle the ceding company's claim is much higher.
The ceding company has the option to offer an Individual risk to the reinsurer and the reinsurer retains the right to accept or reject the risk.
According to the official, the NPC will take more steps in privatization process this year through ceding shares of other state owned petrochemical companies to the private sector.
With the ceding of 338 shares by Christensen, he owns 10,300 shares in DiaGenic and the reverse share split stands settled.
Israel is not generously contemplating ceding its own land to Palestine but insisting that Palestine cede indisputably Palestinian lands to Israel.
In response to a question from one lawmaker, Clinton said the president of Pakistan Asif Ali Zardari has pursued a policy of ceding more and more territory to the Taliban and others.
Funds withheld are monies a ceding company holds to get credit for non-admitted reinsurance, to reduce credit risk or to retain control over investments.
That is the basic reason why a deal will be so hard to achieve, unless Tehran gives the US what it cannot refuse - a Libyan or North Korean-style formula, i.e., ceding its plan to have nuclear weapons and joining the American-led alliance.
THE CEDING OF POWER: HAS CONGRESS ABDICATED ITS WAR-MAKING POWERS is a call to action for citizens who want to understand how wars are initiated by the U.S.
And this is just a partial list of negatives that will accrue by ceding just one little part of our sovereignty.
Sumner's sophisticated, rigorous, and theologically challenging work comprises a strenuous effort to move Christian discourse in inter-religious dialogue past what he calls "the quagmire of pluralism"--that is, the impasse created by competing truth claims among the various faiths in dialogue, which appear to require ceding the primacy of Christ in order to participate.