celebrity


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From Athens to Barcelona to Reykjavik, Celebrity Cruises has all of Europe covered with the brand's award-winning fleet that delivers modern luxury vacations.
In the contemporary environment it is very difficult for the marketers to differentiate their advertisements from others as now-a-days most of the companies are making their advertisement attractive, modern and colorful and most of the customers does not pay desired level of attention to the advertisements and also to its attributes and components as they believe all the advertisement from competing firms are almost similar but there is one element which has not been ignored by the consumers and it is Celebrity endorsement in advertisements, and we can state that use of celebrities in the advertisements is highly beneficial for the advertisers.
Traditional endorsements in which the celebrity gets a fee for promoting a product, such as Beyonce's endorsement of Pepsi;
By allowing budget and availability restrictions the celebrity will be singled out who best constitutes the suitable symbolic features.
Susan Zechter, Founder of Celebrity HotSpots and Author of the Celebrity HotSpots guidebook series, states "There are many celebrity-oriented sites that focus on what celebrities are wearing, who they have or have not been dating, or simply are all about gossip.
This, in my opinion is just another side of the celebrity cult.
The essence of celebrity lies in the public interest in the person which leads to their high visibility in the media.
One of the difficulties in determining the historical beginning of literary celebrity is that it's often confused with literary fame.
John's) Carnival, Celebrity, Costa, Crystal, Holland America, MSC, Norwegian, Oceania, Orient, Princess, Radisson Seven Seas, Royal Caribbean, Seabourn, Silversea, Windjammer.
Wagner's piece, from November 2003, contains most of the devices we've come to loathe in celebrity profiles: precious descriptions of banal interactions, an intrusive and unabashedly narcissistic use of the first and second person, and a hyper-inflationary regard for the interviewee's wisdom and earthly importance.
Mr: Leonard Cohen, much of the peculiar and particular world of celebrity involves pretense, and a desire to know how one appears while pretending, in order to better manipulate the pretense.
Lloyd's of London has issued many of the celebrity policies, with such clients as Billy Joel, the Rolling Stones, and Michael Flatley.