Chairman

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CHAIRMAN. The presiding officer of a committee; as, chairman of the committee of ways and means. The person selected to preside over a popular meeting, is also called a chairman or moderator.

References in classic literature ?
"Do, Grandfather, talk to us about this chair," she repeated.
"Well, child," said Grandfather, patting Clara's cheek, "I can tell you a great many stories of my chair. Perhaps your cousin Laurence would like to hear them too.
His young fancy kindled at the idea of knowing all the adventures of this venerable chair. He looked eagerly in Grandfather's face; and even Charley, a bold, brisk, restless little fellow of nine, sat himself down on the carpet, and resolved to be quiet for at least ten minutes, should the story last so long.
Downward and downward the hideous apparition made its slow progress, until it stopped close over Agnes--stopped, and turned slowly, so that the face of it confronted the upturned face of the woman in the chair.
The eyes revealed themselves, bright with the glassy film of death--and fixed their dreadful look on the woman in the chair.
"'I may as well see one real chair, as two or three complete sets of false ones," said Tom, bringing out his head from under the bedclothes.
'Tom gazed at the chair; and, suddenly as he looked at it, a most extraordinary change seemed to come over it.
'"Because I like it, Tom Smart," said the chair; or the old gentleman, whichever you like to call him.
The block-and-tackle, running like a trolley on the overhead track, made it possible for the assistant to seize his tail and drag him through the air till he was above the chair. His helpless body guided thus by the tail, his chest jabbed by the iron fork in Mulcachy's hands, the rope was suddenly lowered, and Ben Bolt, with swimming brain, found himself seated in the chair.
Once more he was swung into position by his tail, jabbed in the chest, and lowered suddenly on the run--but so suddenly, with a frantic twist of his body on his part, that he fell violently across the chair on his belly.
Eustace speaks: 'My dear fellow, be particularly careful not to make any noise; don't bowl your chair up and down the corridor to-night.' Dexter inquires, 'Why?' Eustace answers: 'Mrs.
Put these things together in your own mind, and you will know what my thoughts were, as I sat waiting for events in my chair, without my telling you.