charter

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Charter

A grant from the government of ownership rights in land to a person, a group of people, or an organization such as a corporation.

A basic document of law of a Municipal Corporation granted by the state, defining its rights, liabilities, and responsibilities of self-government.

A document embodying a grant of authority from the legislature or the authority itself, such as a corporate charter.The leasing of a mode of transportation, such as a bus, ship, or plane. A charter-party is a contract formed to lease a ship to a merchant in order to facilitate the conveyance of goods.

charter

n. the name for Articles of Incorporation in some states, as in a corporate charter.

charter

(Declaration of rights), noun announcement, constitution, decree, official announcement, proclamation, promulgation, pronouncement, public announcement, public statement, publication, writing
Associated concepts: amendment of a charter, amendment to a charter, articles of incorporation, charter of a foreign corporation, charter of a municipal corporation, charter of an association, corporate charter, county charter, municipal charter, partnership charter, reform a charter, repeal of a charter, special charter, state charter

charter

(License), noun authority, certificate, certifiiate of permission, dispensation, express permission, grant, imprimatur, instrument, muniment, official docuuent, patent, permit, written permission
Associated concepts: chartered bank, chartered by law, exxiration of a charter, renewal of a charter

charter

(Sanction), noun acceptance, acquiescence, admission, allowance, approval, assent, authority, authorization, concurrence, consent, countenance, delegation, empowerment, endorsement, enfranchisement, entitlement, franchise, grant, leave, liberty, license, permission, permit, pragmatic sanction, privilege, ratification, recognition, sufferance, support, tolerance, toleration, vested right
Associated concepts: chartered by the law
See also: agreement, allow, appoint, appointment, approve, authority, authorize, bestow, brevet, bylaw, capacity, certificate, certify, code, confirm, constitute, constitution, contract, countenance, deed, delegate, document, enactment, engage, establish, franchise, hire, immunity, incorporate, instrument, invest, launch, law, lease, let, license, ordinance, pact, pandect, permission, permit, prerogative, privilege, protocol, rent, sanction, tolerance, treaty, vest, warrant

CHARTER. A grant made by the sovereign either to the whole people or to a portion of them, securing to them the enjoyment of certain rights. Of the former kind is the late charter of France, which extended to the whole country; the charters which were granted to the different American colonies by the British government were charters of the latter species. 1 Story, Const. L. Sec. 161; 1 Bl. Com. 108 Encycl. Amer. Charte Constitutionelle.
     2. A charter differs from a CONSTITUTION in this, that the former is granted by the sovereign, while the latter is established by the people themselves : both are the fundamental law of the land.
     3. This term is susceptible of another signification. During the middle ages almost every document was called carta, charta, or chartula. In this sense the term is nearly synonymous with deed. Co. Litt. 6; 1 Co. 1; Moor. Cas. 687.
     4. The act of the legislature creating a corporation, is called its charter. Vide 3 Bro. Civ. and Adm. Law, 188; Dane's Ab. h.t.

CHARTER, mar. contr. An agreement by which a vessel is hired by the owner to another; as A B chartered the ship Benjamin Franklin to C D.

References in periodicals archive ?
WASHINGTON -- Fourth-graders in traditional public schools did significantly better in reading and math than comparable children attending charter schools, according to a report released on Tuesday by the federal Education Department.
This comment is apropos to any discussion of charter school research, especially recent findings from Robert Bifulco and Helen Ladd ("Results from the Tar Heel State," research, Fall 2005).
Lost in the din of political static is a new wave of public expectation for doing more with less in public higher education that has rekindled the charter debate.
The Florida legislature approved charter schools in 1996.
In general, Mediterranean charters are more cultural, with frequent trips ashore, while those in the Caribbean are more oriented toward water sports.
The National Assessment of Educational Progress results for 2003 show that fourth graders in charter schools performed about a half year behind their peers in traditional public schools in reading and math even when comparing students eligible for free lunch or comparing students in central cities.
Third, even without added rules and regulations, it is hard to start a charter school.
The number of charter schools--tax-funded institutions that operate independently of public school bureaucracies--was growing rapidly, especially in California.
Despite its clear legal obligation, San Diego Unified's Board of Education has ignored the law by denying eight of the nine requests for facilities made by its start-up charter schools, including those of Fanno and KIPP.
Caprice Young, CEO of the California Charter Schools Association - the membership and professional organization serving the 574 charter schools in the state - expects to see the LAUSD approve its 100th charter campus this spring.
We address this question here by examining the link between the establishment of charter schools in North Carolina and average student proficiency rates at the traditional public schools most affected by the new source of competition.