chief

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chief

noun boss, captain, caput, chairman, chief controller, chieftain, commandant, commander, directing head, director, dux, employer, foreman, general, head, headman, headperson, highest ranking person, leader, manager, organizer, overlooker, overseer, person in authority, person in charge, president, princeps, principal, principal person, senior, superior, supervising director
Associated concepts: chief agent, chief counsel, chief deputy, chief examiner, chief executive, chief executive officer, chief fiscal officer, chief judge, chief justice, chief of fire department, chief of police, chief officer of a corporation or business, chief place of business
See also: absolute, basic, best, cardinal, central, critical, crucial, director, dominant, employer, essential, grave, important, leading, major, master, necessary, outstanding, paramount, prevailing, prevalent, primary, prime, principal, prominent, salient, sovereign, stellar, superintendent, superior, superlative, vital

CHIEF, principal. One who is put above the rest; as, chief magistrate chief justice : it also signifies the best of a number of things. It is frequently used in composition.

References in periodicals archive ?
The law of succession, as they saw it and as Africans themselves typically represented, was that the son of the "right hand house" inherited the position of chiefship.
The invention of sovereignty naturalized some political principles, most obviously chiefship.
One of the ironies of the conquest period is that the invention of tribal sovereignty seemed necessary for one of the avowed goals of early colonialism: the destruction of chiefship and the "civilization" of the native.
Decades of attacks on ideas and institutions of chiefship, patronage, and paternal authority weakened Ganda social rituals and institutions as Baganda sought strength.
Some suggest that these initiatives increasingly transformed chiefship from a locally based institution to something that was top down from the center, with councils to be put up for development and political participation.
While British officials and missionaries continued to be charmed by the Baganda gentlemen who worked for them in chiefships and other positions of authority, the clashes of the 1940s left Baganda looking for more than manners, grace, and effective hospitality in their leaders.
relations, kinship, chiefship and ideas of the person.
those of balanced reciprocity even while the rituals of chiefship render
For Hocart this process characterised the development of Fijian chiefship.
The tension between hierarchy and equality given respectively by relations between kin within the household and kin relations between cross-cousins as affines across households can be historically related to the nature of chiefship.
Hanson speculates that the ebitongole chiefships, which emerged in Buganda in the late 1700s as a way to organize workers and land, were not about consolidating royal power, but rather became a "mechanism for organising the labour of war captives," whose incorporation "profoundly destabilised the Buganda kingdom" (p.