child

(redirected from childlessness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

child

n. 1) a person's natural offspring. 2) a person 14 years and under. A "child" should be distinguished from a "minor" who is anyone under 18 in almost all states.

child

noun adolescent, boy, daughter, filia, filius, fosser child, girl, grandchild, infant, ingenue, issue, lineal descendant, minor, newborn, offspring, scion, young, young boy, young descendant, young girl, youngling, youngster, youth
Associated concepts: abandoned child, abortive child, adopted child, afterborn child, child born out of wedlock, child by future marriage, child custody, child labor, child support, childbirth, childcare, childhood, en ventre sa mere, foster child, illegitimate child, legitimate child, minor child, natural child, neglected child, orphan, posthumous child, pretermitted child, stepchild
See also: dependent, descendant, infant, issue, juvenile, minor, offspring, progeny

child

1 a young person. The law in either England and Scotland cannot be said to offer any single definition of the word. Various ages are defined as childhood, but all are under the age of majority, which is 18.
2 in wills and deeds, ‘child’ can refer to persons of any age. Normally ‘child’ will refer to issue in the first generation only, excluding grandchildren or remoter issue, but if the testator's intention can be interpreted as including descendants then the position maybe different.
3 throughout the UK for the purposes of child support, a qualifying child is a person under the age of 16 or under 19 and in full-time (but not advanced) education or under 18 in certain circumstances and a person who has not contracted a valid, void or annulled marriage. A qualifying child is one for which one or both parents is an absent parent.

CHILD, CHILDREN, domestic relations. A child is the son or daughter in relation to the father or mother.
     2. We will here consider the law, in general terms, as it relates to the condition, duties, and rights of children; and, afterwards, the extent which has been given to the word child or children by dispositions in wills and testaments.
     3.-1. Children born in lawful wedlock, or within a competent time afterwards, are presumed to be the issue of the father, and follow his condition; those born out of lawful wedlock, follow the condition of the mother. The father is bound to maintain his children and to educate them, and to protect them from injuries. Children are, on their part, bound to maintain their fathers and mothers, when in need, and they are of ability so to do. Poth. Du Marriage, n. 384, 389. The father in general is entitled to the custody of minor children, but, under certain circumstances, the mother will be entitled to them, when the father and mother have separated. 5 Binn. 520. Children are liable to the reasonable correction of their parents. Vide Correction
     4.-2. The term children does not ordinarily and properly speaking comprehend grandchildren, or issue generally; yet sometimes that meaning is, affixed to it, in cases of necessity; 6 Co. 16; and it has been held to signify the same as issue, in cases where the testator, by using the terms children and issue indiscriminately, showed his intention to use the former term in the sense of issue, so as to entitle grandchildren, & c., to take under it. 1 Ves. sen. 196; Ambl. 555; 3 Ves. 258; Ambl. 661; 3 Ves. & Bea. 69. When legally construed, the term children is confined to legitimate children. 7 Ves. 458. The civil code of Louisiana, art. 2522, n. 14, enacts, that "under the, name of children are comprehended, not only children of the first degree, but the grandchildren, great-grand-children, and all other descendants in the direct line."
     5. Children are divided into legitimate children, or those born in lawful wedlock; and natural or illegitimate children, who are born bastards. (q.v.) Vide Natural Children. Illegitimate children are incestuous bastards, or those which are not incestuous.
     6. Posthumous children are those who are born after the death of their fathers. Domat, Lois Civ. liv. prel. t. 2, s. 1, Sec. 7 L. 3, Sec. 1, ff de inj. rupt.
     7. In Pennsylvania, the will of their fathers, in, which no provision is made for them, is revoked, as far as regards them, by operation of law. 3 Binn. R. 498. See, as to the law of Virginia on this subject, 3 Munf. 20, and article In ventre sa mere. Vide, generally, 8 Vin. Ab. 318; 8 Com. Dig. 470; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; 2 Kent, Com. 172; 4 Kent, Com. 408, 9; 1 Rop. on Leg. 45 to 76; 1 Supp. to Ves. jr. 442 Id. 158; Natural children.

References in periodicals archive ?
Mollen (2006) recommended that psychotherapists working with childfree women attend to their assumptions about voluntary childlessness, be critical of pronatalist life developmental theories, process and embrace childfree female clients' life choices, and empower childfree women to manage pronatalist societal pressures.
Liefbroer, 2012, <<The Attitude Towards Voluntary Childlessness in Europe: Cultural and Institutional Explanations>>, Journal of Marriage and Family, 74, 3:587-600.
Acknowledgements: Thanks are due to national statistical offices, the Office of National Statistics (ONS), the Welsh Cancer Intelligence Service (WCIS), the Scottish and Northern Irish cancer registeries, and to the Department of Health for national data on breast cancer incidence and risk factors such as fertility, abortion, childlessness, and mean age at first birth.
De-stigmatizing both voluntary and involuntary childlessness could broaden our definitions of human belonging.
The focus of our study is on childlessness and multi-partner fertility-two phenomena that have been on the increase, especially among men (Lappegard, 2007; Skrede, 2005).
Mean difference and t-value of Existence of Tension before adoption because of Childlessness (N=80)
Modern discussions that could relate to this topic include concern about when life begins, the ethical use of technology for dealing with infertility, thankfulness over the wonder of life, and the sorrow over childlessness.
Maximova K and Quesnel-Vallee A, Mental health consequences of unintended childlessness and unplanned births: gender differences and life course dynamics, Social Science & Medicine, 2009, 68(5):850-857.
Anaise is conscious of the fact that it was not her actions but her childlessness that determined her fate, both marital and otherwise: "I now realize that Leo was secretly resentful of my barren womb.
Her childlessness plunges her into scandal and despair until she meets a mysterious spiritual guide.
California does have a higher rate of childlessness, but the reasons are hard to pin down," said Hans Johnson, the report's author, noting that the state generally offers higher wages, and women might be more likely to focus on their careers because of that.