civil marriage


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civil marriage

a marriage performed by some official other than a clergyman.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first woman interior minister in Lebanon and the Arab region, Hassan has voiced support for the right to a civil marriage, but received immediate pushback from religious authorities who want family matters to remain under the jurisdiction of religious courts.
There is no civil marriage in Lebanon--a country with 18 different religious demonimations--and many citizens have to travel abroad to get married to anyone outside of their religious sect.
On Friday, the newly-appointed Interior Minister, Raya al-Hassan, appeared on an interview with Euronews where she vowed to raise the civil marriage issue to religious authorities with the support of Prime Minister Saad Hariri.
Church weddings showed a slight increase from 2016 (3,942 to 3,926) and civil marriages dropped from 9,632 in 2016 to 9,120 in 2017.
Section 88A states that the agreement of 'both parties' in a civil marriage is required before a minor is allowed to convert to Islam.
Some 72% of Jewish Israelis and 76% of Arab Israelis support the statement that "every resident [of Israel] has the right to get married in Israel with whomever he chooses, in whatever way he chooses, and according to his beliefs," but at the same time, only 43% of the Arab-Israeli public support allowing civil marriage and divorce in Israel, according to the poll released Tuesday by Hiddush, an organization that promotes religious pluralism in Israel.
The difference between our civil marriage having being blessed, compared to being married in the church building, is not enough cause for dividing our Communion.
However, other churches have different opinions on civil marriage and on the personal status law in general.
The Newtownabbey man added: "Equality is not a luxury, it is a right and at the moment in Northern Ireland civil marriage is not open to everyone so people are not being treated with equality.
The Catholic bishops of this country have been nearly univocal in denouncing any attempt to redefine civil marriage. Individual bishops have devoted large amounts of financial and other diocesan resources in political activity to oppose changes to the civil law.
A church representative did not, however, take a hardline stance against civil marriage.
Note that I am referring to civil marriage, not church marriage.