clam

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Related to clammer: clamming, clamming up

clam

‘secretly’.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both Clammer and Rodan raise the issue of the lack of institutionalization of universal human rights under the PAP government.
Also reporting to Clammer, Cann will be responsible for running Aspen Insurance's Bermuda FINPRO team.
Es importante destacar que, en la mayoria de las definiciones, los autores se centran en el consumo simbolico de "productos" (Landon, 1974; Csikszentmihalyi y RochbergHalton, 1981; Belk, 1984; McCracken, 1987; Lorenzi, 1991; Clammer, 1992; Dittmar, 1992; Ger y Belk, 1996; Fenollar y Ruiz 2006).
However, most of the research examine two variables in order to analyze this construct: consumers' identity and the meaning of products in society (Belk, 1984; Clammer, 1992; Csikszentmihalyi & Rochberg-Halton, 1981; Dittmar, 1992; Edson & Bettman, 2005; Fenollar & Ruiz, 2006; Ger & Belk, 1996; Landon, 1974; Lee, 2013; Lorenzi, 1991; McCracken, 1987; Park, Deborah, Priester, Eisingerich, & lacobucci, 2010; Sun, Wang, Lepp, & Robertson, 2014).
"THE SWITCH has established a world-class reputation by providing industry leading innovation and reliability in the broadcast video market," says Adam Clammer , Founding Partner of True Wind Capital.
(13.) See, e.g., Yoshio Sugimoto, An Introduction to Japanese Society (1997); John Clammer, Japan and Its Others (2001); Ian J.
[6] CLAMMER, John (2000): "Received Dreams--Consumer Capitalism, Social Process and the Management of the Emotions in Contemporary Japan", in: J.
In one of the most popular English-language guidebooks for Haiti, Paul Clammer's Dominican Republic & Haiti, there is a short section on "Photography & Video" where the authors offer advice about the tourist's gaze:
As J Clammer writes in his 1985 book, Singapore: Ideology, Society, Culture, "English is seen as the language of technology and management, and the Asian languages as carriers of cultural values."
While technological changes altered the manufacturing end of the business, a clammer in the 1930s operated much like one from the late 1890s.
By the late 1980s, the new materials they produced (Greig, Pike, & Selby, 1987; Beddis, 1988) were challenging the parochialism and conservatism of much that was previously available and were being joined by other exciting texts (Hopkin & Morris, 1987; Clammer et al, 1987).
Consumption has also been understood as a response (from younger generations) to established values and, in particular, to workplace structures that espouse self-sacrifice and denial of personal desire (Clammer 54, 59; Skov and Moeran 28-31).