clerk

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Clerk

A person employed in an office or government agency who performs various tasks such as keeping records or accounts, filing, letter writing, or transcribing. One who works in a store and whose job might include working as a cashier, selling merchandise, or waiting on customers.

A law clerk is either a law student employed by a licensed attorney to do mundane legal tasks and learn the law in the process, or a licensed lawyer working for a judge to aid in the writing and research of the cases before the judge.

clerk

n. 1) an official or employee who handles the business of a court or a system of courts, maintains files of each case, and issues routine documents. Almost every county has a clerk of the courts or County Clerk who fulfills those functions, and most courtrooms have a clerk to keep records and assist the judge in the management of the court. 3) a young lawyer who assists a judge or a senior attorney in research and drafting of documents, usually for a year or two, and benefits in at least two ways: learning from the judge and enjoying association with the judge. Law clerks for judges, particularly on the Courts of Appeal and the Supreme Court, are chosen from among the top students graduating from law school. 2) a person who works in an office or a store who performs physical work such as filing, stocking shelves, or counter sales.

clerk

noun archivist, chronicler, copyist, court emmloyee, court official, court scribe, judicial administrator, juuicial assistant, judicial recorder, judicial secretary, office holder, office worker, official, prothonotary, recorder, record keeper, registrar, scriba, scribe, scrivener, secretary
Associated concepts: clerk of the county, clerk of the court, county clerk, papers filed with the clerk, town clerk
Foreign phrases: Errores scribentis nocere non debent. An error made by a clerk ought not to prejudice.

clerk

verb aid a judge, assist a judge, help a judge, work for a judge
See also: accountant, amanuensis, assistant

clerk

1 one who assists a solicitor. Formerly, if in training to become a solicitor, the assistant was known as an articled clerk.
2 a clerk to the justices in England or the clerk of court in Scotland is a legally qualified person who sits in court with lay justices to advise them on points of law. The clerk of the House is a senior official ofthe House of Commons.

CLERK, commerce, contract. A person in the employ of a merchant, who attends only to a part of his business, while the merchant himself superintends the whole. He differs from a factor in this, that the latter wholly supplies the place of his principal in respect to the property consigned to him. Pard. Dr. Com. n. 38, 1 Chit. Pract. 80; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1287.

CLERK, officer. A person employed in an office, public or private, for keeping records or accounts. His business is to write or register, in proper form, the transactions of the tribunal or body to which he belongs. Some clerks, however, have little or no writing to do in their offices, as, the clerk of the market, whose duties are confined chiefly to superintending the markets. In the English law, clerk also signifies a clergyman.

CLERK, eccl. law. Every individual, who is attached to the ecclesiastical state, and who has submitted to the ceremony of the tonsure, is a clerk.

References in classic literature ?
On a Thursday evening, the day after the ministerial reception and Madame Rabourdin's evening party, just as Antoine was trimming his beard and his nephews were assisting him in the antechamber of the division on the upper floor, they were surprised by the unexpected arrival of one of the clerks.
said the clerk breathlessly, and quite exhausted he seated himself on a bank.
They reached the office of the procurator after having passed through the antechamber in which the clerks were, and the study in which they ought to have been.
Without further interruption, we reached the front office, where we found the clerk and the man in velveteen with the fur cap.
Having very vehemently stirred a particularly large fire with a particularly small poker, the clerk led the way to his principal's private room, and announced Mr.
All I know is,' said Miss Sally, smiling drily, for she delighted in nothing so much as irritating her brother, 'that if every one of your clients is to force us to keep a clerk, whether we want to or not, you had better leave off business, strike yourself off the roll, and get taken in execution, as soon as you can.
Nobody at home to keep house for me," said the clerk, with a cheerful sense of perfect freedom from all family encumbrances.
Her friend the reception clerk was engaged in conversation with one or two men, a conversation of which she was obviously the subject.
Vronsky saw all the thanklessness of the business, and that there could be no question of a duel in it, that everything must be done to soften the government clerk, and hush the matter up.
There were festoons of rope-ladders - none so ingenious as ours - and then at last there was something that the clerk knew all.
The priests took their places in front of the judge, and the clerk proceeded to read in a loud voice a complaint of sacrilege against Phileas Fogg and his servant, who were accused of having violated a place held consecrated by the Brahmin religion.
Even as he did so he thought he perceived a certain haziness of eye and speech in his trustee; but he was too hopeful to be stayed, silenced the voice of warning in his bosom, and with one and the same gesture committed the money to the clerk, and himself into the hands of destiny.