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Close

A parcel of land that is surrounded by a boundary of some kind, such as a hedge or a fence. To culminate, complete, finish, or bring to an end. To seal up. To restrict to a certain class. A narrow margin, as in a close election.

A person can close a bank account; a trial may be closed after each lawyer has concluded his or her presentation in the case at bar.

close

1 private property, usually enclosed by a fence, hedge, or wall.
2 a courtyard or quadrangle enclosed by buildings or an entry leading to such a courtyard.
3 the entry from the street to a tenement building.

CLOSE. Signifies the interest in the soil, and not merely a close or enclosure in the common acceptation of the term. Doct. & Stud. 307 East, 207 2 Stra. 1004; 6 East, 1541 Burr. 133 1 Ch. R. 160.
     2. In every case where one man has a right to exclude another from his land, the law encircles it, if not already enclosed, with an imaginary fence; and entitles him to a compensation in damages for the injury he sustains by the act of another passing through his boundary, denominating the injurious act a breach of the enclosure. Hamm. N. P. 151; Doct. & Stud. dial. 1, c. 8, p. 30; 2 Whart. 430.
     3. An ejectment will not lie for a close. 11 Rep. 55; 1 Rolle's R. 55 Salk. 254 Cro. Eliz. 235; Adams on Eject. 24.

References in classic literature ?
They were not pretty to look upon with their close-set eyes, flat noses, long upper lips and protruding yellow fangs.
Bradley, seeing that he had as good an opportunity as the others to escape, now turned his attention to extricating himself; and as the woods seemed dense on the right, he ran in that direction, hoping that the close-set boles would prevent pursuit on the part of the great reptile.
The elastic "waistband" is advertised to "fit most adult heads," but looks best on gourds with tiny, close-set eyes, we're thinkin'.