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Close

A parcel of land that is surrounded by a boundary of some kind, such as a hedge or a fence. To culminate, complete, finish, or bring to an end. To seal up. To restrict to a certain class. A narrow margin, as in a close election.

A person can close a bank account; a trial may be closed after each lawyer has concluded his or her presentation in the case at bar.

close

(Intimate), adjective allied, bosom, brotherly, confidential, dear, devoted, faithful, familiar, fast, fraternal, friendly, inseparable, strongly attached
Associated concepts: close corporation, closely held

close

(Near), adjective adjacent, adjoining, approximate, at hand, bordering, close at hand, close by, coming, contiguous, forthcoming, handy, imminent, in close proximity, in the area, in the neighborrood, in the vicinity, near at hand, nearby, neighboring, nigh, propinquus, proximal, proximate, tangent, touching, vicinal
Associated concepts: close confinement, close proximity

close

(Rigorous), adjective assiduous, attentive, conscientious, diligent, earnest, exact, hard, harsh, keen, meticulous, parcus, precise, punctilious, rigid, scrupulous, severe, sharp, stiff, strict, stringent, tenax, uncompromising, unremitting, unsparing

close

(Conclusion), noun adjournment, cessation, closing, closure, completion, conclusio, consummation, discontinuance, discontinuation, end, ending, expiration, finis, finish, last part, last stage, omega, peroration, shutdown, stoppage, termination, terminus, windup
Associated concepts: the close of a trial, the closing on a real estate transaction

close

(Enclosed area), noun compound, confine, court, courtyard, enclosure, grounds, pen, precinct, square, yard
Associated concepts: breaking the close

close

(Agree), verb accept an offer, arrive at an agreeeent, bargain, come to an arrangement, come to an unnerstanding, come to terms, consent, endorse, enter into a contractual obligation, establish by agreement, execute, finalize an agreement, fix by agreement, give assurrnce, go to contract, guarantee, make a bargain, make an agreement, negotiate, pacisci, seek accord, settle, strike a bargain, subscribe, undertake, underwrite
Associated concepts: close a business transaction, close a real estate transaction

close

(Terminate), verb apply the closure, break off, bring to an end, call a halt, cause a stoppage, cease, come to a stop, come to an end, complete, conclude, consummate, discontinue, dispatch, dispose of, eliminate, end, expire, finish, finish up, fulfill, halt, have run its course, interrupt, make an end of, make inactive, operire, proseeute to a conclusion, put a stop to, run out, shut down, stop, surcease, suspend, suspend operation, wind up
Associated concepts: close a bank account, close a case, close a grand jury investigation, close an investigation
See also: abandon, approximate, block, brief, cease, cessation, clog, cognate, coherent, cohesive, compact, comparable, complete, conclude, conclusion, constrict, contestable, contiguous, culminate, death, defeasance, denouement, discontinue, dispatch, dissolution, end, exact, expiration, expire, extremity, faithful, finality, finish, future, grapple, halt, hidden, illiberal, immediate, imminent, inarticulate, indivisible, inhibit, inseparable, instant, intense, intimate, literal, local, lock, moratorium, noncommittal, obturate, occlude, outcome, pendent, pending, penurious, populous, precise, present, proximate, secret, shut, similar, solid, stop, strict, taciturn, terminate, termination

close

1 private property, usually enclosed by a fence, hedge, or wall.
2 a courtyard or quadrangle enclosed by buildings or an entry leading to such a courtyard.
3 the entry from the street to a tenement building.

CLOSE. Signifies the interest in the soil, and not merely a close or enclosure in the common acceptation of the term. Doct. & Stud. 307 East, 207 2 Stra. 1004; 6 East, 1541 Burr. 133 1 Ch. R. 160.
     2. In every case where one man has a right to exclude another from his land, the law encircles it, if not already enclosed, with an imaginary fence; and entitles him to a compensation in damages for the injury he sustains by the act of another passing through his boundary, denominating the injurious act a breach of the enclosure. Hamm. N. P. 151; Doct. & Stud. dial. 1, c. 8, p. 30; 2 Whart. 430.
     3. An ejectment will not lie for a close. 11 Rep. 55; 1 Rolle's R. 55 Salk. 254 Cro. Eliz. 235; Adams on Eject. 24.

References in periodicals archive ?
But for the rest of us, let us retain just a piece of our dignity and not have the unrelenting live camera lens probe our most secret and sensitive physical defects, not noticed in the give-and-take of daily life--but magnified beyond endurance, especially in the large-screen video close-up.
Close-ups rob the viewer of the wider game, replays are always shown at the expense of the live action.
Bookbinder admitted the close-ups of children's private parts could be a turn-on for perverts.
In contrast to the synthetically narrative images of the boutique, far closer to film stills than documentary photos, the Slaves are (with the exception of one almost full-length portrait of the Rebellious Slave barely emerging from stone and shadows alike) analytically fragmented into close-ups of heads, torsos, and lower limbs.
The two chameleons photographed for the book are panther chameleons from Madagascar: the 'plot' may read like fiction but the very simple coverage is all factual - and appealing with its colorful close-ups.
A visual area known to respond to faces displayed intense activity as film watchers saw facial close-ups.
However, if a two-camera setup is used, the cameras should be placed next to each other--one for wide shots; the other for close-ups.