model

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model

noun antetype, archetype, copy, copy in miniature, design, example, exemplar, exemplum, gauge, guide, ideal, image, imitation, miniature, mold, paradigm, paragon, pattern, plan, precedent, prototype, replica, representation, sample, specimen, standard
Associated concepts: Model Code
See also: absolute, arrangement, build, case, code, copy, criterion, design, epitome, example, exemplar, exemplary, forge, form, guide, ideal, illustration, instance, laudable, make, norm, paradigm, paragon, paramount, pattern, precedent, principle, produce, professional, prototype, representative, rule, sample, specimen, standard, stellar, style, symbol, typical

MODEL. A machine made on a small scale to show the manner in which it is to be worked or employed.
     2. The Act of Congress of July 4, 1836, section 6, requires an inventor who is desirous to take out a patent for his invention, to furnish a model of his invention, in all cases which admit of representation by model, of a convenient size to exhibit advantageously its several parts.

References in periodicals archive ?
Like the Clubhouse model, the ACT approach has a proven record of success.
Stages in realizing the international diffusion of a single way of working: The clubhouse model.
Jackson's (2000) book on the clubhouse model, subtitled Empowering Applications of Theory to Generalist Practice, described how the model is designed to empower and provided examples of empowering acts that can be initiated in clubhouses (for example, including members in decisions about club operations, using member skills and aptitudes to carry out the work of the clubhouse, giving members keys to club property for which they have responsibility, and promoting expectations that members will contribute).
Using an approach known as the clubhouse model, the center provides a supportive environment in which people with psychiatric disabilities participate as members, rather than as patients.
It was further informed by Close's subsequent volunteer work at Fountain House, a globally-acclaimed, New York based, clubhouse model program that provides people with mental illness critical access to education, employment and community.