co-optation

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See: acceptance, adoption

CO-OPTATION. A concurring choice. Sometimes applied to the act of the members of a corporation, in choosing a person to supply a vacancy. in their body.

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Identifying the interest groups and the sources of their power can suggest ways to incorporate more diverse views, and is also a sound approach for guarding against co-option of the social contract itself.
But even if this is the case, Low succeeds in showing the ways in which the co-option of certain (selected) memories have been utilized in the Singaporean nation-building project.
While this boundary-blurring is not new, what is new is the active co-option of the audience in the production (crowdsourcing) and distribution (buzz, viral marketing) of branded marketing messages.
In such action, McMahon sees not "the co-option of the private family as an informal apparatus of the state" but rather the anticipation of "a time when people will be free to form families according to the claims of their own desire" (172).
This book highlights two unusual developments in the foreign aid hosting of the United States: first, "the co-option of foreign aid by the military"(p.
Competition, confrontation and co-option are some ways to describe the relationship between Al-Azhar and the Egyptian government
We must taper our search down to a few helpful cues: servitude, subjugation, co-option, compromise or happy reconciliation?
If co-option did not work, the second strategy was to balance different families against each other.
The pic's first two-thirds, which trace the strange story of Lebanon's aborted venture into the space race from 1960-66; prove far more fascinating than the final half-hour, which follows helmers Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige's co-option of this peculiar history for their multimedia project.
They focus on the biomedical aspects of the placenta, how the placenta functions as a regulatory organ, the co-option of the immune system to become a regulatory system in early gestation, the evolution of genetic regulatory mechanisms made possible by the presence of the placenta, and the biological anthropology of the placenta.
Translation serves as a metaphor even for the method of the book itself, which appropriates concepts from many fields and deploys them in new contexts, enacting in this way the very processes of co-option, active reception, and transformation exhibited by the objects themselves.
If we use the evolutionary mechanism of co-option, Bering's insights on the origin of our religious instincts can be aligned with the traditional notion of natural revelation both in nature (Rom.