codify

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codify

to arrange and label a system of laws.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since the transfer of tacit knowledge is known to be more difficult owing to its complexity and lack of codifiability, even stronger relationships with repeated, and typically face-to-face, interactions are necessary for effective transfer (Hansen, 1999).
(2001), 'Expert systems: aspects of and limitations to the codifiability of knowledge', Research Policy, 30, pp.
In addition, in order for the manufacturers to validate the research results and monitor progress within the R&D process, it is necessary for there to be a high degree of codifiability and teachability if they are to be able to clearly lay hold of the progress and results of the Mainland Chinese research institutions.
The simple informational codifiability continuum model in Figure 1 suggests a new interpretation on the public goods versus private goods distinction.
Third, Carr and Ring's (2017) finding that knowledge codifiability moderates the relationship between knowledge integration and family harmony provides a new perspective on how knowledge creates value.
(13) Along the same lines, Finnegan (92-93) has noted that "the vinaya's 'extremely detailed set of rules' may actually reflect more a sense of the inadequacy of rules to cover the particularity of living situations, than it does any conviction in their final codifiability" (see 92-112 for her larger discussion of this issue).
The theoretical model developed in this paper is based on an alignment principle that draws heavily on Williamson's (1981) Transaction Cost Theory (TCT) concept of asset specificity and opportunism, as well as on the work of Zander and Kogut (1995) who identify the attributes of innovation knowledge as codifiability, teachability, complexity, and system dependence.
It is therefore associated with codifiability (Boisot 1998; Winter 1987) and the extent to which component knowledge can easily be shared among technical specialists (Wade 1995).
The knowledge stored in these memories can be separated on the basis of its degree of codifiability (Winter, 1987).
Zander and Kogut (1995) have shown that increasing degrees of knowledge codifiability and teachability speed knowledge transfer.
Higher levels of knowledge tacitness, in terms of absence of codifiability, teachability, and observability, and in the presence of more complexity and system embeddedness, may exacerbate the challenges of achieving effective ICT knowledge transfer and adoption, thereby amplifying the (expected positive) impact of procedural justice.