codify

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codify

to arrange and label a system of laws.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This gives rise to two polar labour flexibility configurations depending on how tacit/ codifiable knowledge is.
The existence of mechanisms capable of facilitating the transfer of codifiable knowledge was assessed through the existence of an HR Information System in the worldwide company.
[T]he less codifiable and the harder to teach is the technology, the more likely the transfer will be to wholly owned operations.
If strategic resources are understood from a competency perspective to include any simple, identifiable, codifiable resources to include intangible property such as patents and trademarks as well as physical items such as machinery, we can see that such resources can certainly generate economic quasi-rents due to their short-term scarcity and potential for adding value (Peteraf 1993).
This constitutes the fear from how technology is changing the nature of work and replacing humans in codifiable tasks.
The authors asserted that in-person interactions facilitate the diffusion of experiences, conversion of tacit knowledge to a codifiable form, and ongoing learning by individual actors (also see Alavi and Leidner 2001).
David Autor of Massachusetts Institute of Technology argues that the extent of machine substitution for human labor is overstated: though computers substitute for workers in performing routine codifiable tasks, they also amplify the comparative advantage of people.
Workers involved in routine tasks that are "codifiable" are the most vulnerable.
First, knowledge spillovers are basically externalities (3) which are not easily codifiable, as the amount of information embodied is tacit in nature.
Finally, post-process theorists maintain that "writing processes or activities cannot be taught because there is no such thing as a codifiable writing process" (Hewett, 2015, p.
Blaise Pascal, "arguably the most successful and significant practitioner of written rhetoric in his century" (Lockwood 1996, 273), thus seems to treat the art of persuasion as something with a set of codifiable, if elusive, rules and laws, a sort of geometry of human interiority.