coexisting


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The NGS results from 1208 lung cancer specimens submitted between April 2013 and December 2016 were analyzed for coexisting mutations within EGFR, MAPK, and mTOR pathways.
The incidence of a complete Hydatidiform mole with two coexisting foetuses was unknown due to the rarity of case reports.
If infinitely many attractors coexist for the same set of system parameters, the phenomenon is called extreme multistability [32], showing that various coexisting attractors have essentially extreme multistability.
[sup.2] In a duplex kidney drained by double ureter, the lower moiety is more frequently affected compared to the upper pole due to coexisting complications since the lower moiety is dominant in most patients with renal duplex.[sup.2,5] This was the case in our patient.
The prevalence of many coexisting autoimmune diseases was similar in patients with Graves' disease and those with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.
According to Telefonica Peru, its coexisting Wi-Fi networks will offer unparalleled mobility, with Nomadix gateways providing security, reliability, scalability, flexibility and ease-of-instalment.
* Evaluation of the child with ADHD should include assessment of possible coexisting conditions.
Compared with CVD-related admissions in patients without diabetes, coexisting diabetes increased the risk of CVD-related hospitalization (relative risk [RR] 1.8), the chance of greater hospital charges (RR 1.74), and the chance of a longer length of stay (RR 1.83), Dr.
There is no question about the dramatic effect of stimulants in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but if coexisting conditions remain undiagnosed and untreated, patients may experience only marginal improvements in their school and social interactions.
Given the ease of recordability inherent in VCRs--a feature not yet available in DVD players--the association expects both formats to continue coexisting for quite some time.
In designing his own house in London's fashionable Kensington (AR October 1996), Seth Stein worked with existing structures, expressing their textures, imperfections and odd angles, making old and new coexisting but distinct.
Ambiguity, whether it is manifested in religious beliefs, languages, or even political ideas coexisting in the same family, is seen as a way of life and strength, not as weakness.