cohabitants

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cohabitants

persons living together as husband and wife, whether or not legally married.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
The SC ruled that leaving his wife and family to cohabit with a married mistress definitely transgresses the clearly defined bounds of decency and morality.
Why should the commissioner go into households to regulate as to who police officers should cohabit with, and why should we incur expenses in regulating private affairs of police officers?' he asked.
If you intend to cohabit long-term, think about pension provision.
As the crossing parameters are asymmetrical between sexes and as the parameters above the diagonal differ from those under the diagonal (see above), gender-specific chances to marry or cohabit up the educational hierarchy are presented separately.
Definition: Binary (1,0) dummy variable for whether respondent has ever cohabited and the relationship has ended, or not.
In columns 3-4, we treat married and cohabiting men the same, comparing all partnered men and all men not currently partnered who have been in the past (divorced or previously cohabited) to all never partnered men.
(18) See The National Marriage Project, The State of Our Unions 2001 (Rutgers: State University of New Jersey, 2001) for the variety of reasons that people cohabit.
That picture has become very complicated: couples cohabit before or instead of marrying and they have children in circumstances ranging from marriage to casual sexual partnerships.
Yet by opening the opportunity to unilateral no-fault divorce, people tend to seek more divorces and choose not to marry; they are also more disposed to cohabit. The numbers in support of this situation are alarming.
Our movement played an important role in the 1960s sexual revolution, one of whose lasting effects has been a 1000 percent increase in the rate at which unmarried couples cohabit. (Though as Solot and Miller note, this isn't as revolutionary as it sounds.
Alternatively, men who marry or cohabit may be inher ently different from men who do not.