coin

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COIN, commerce, contracts. A piece of gold, silver or other metal stamped by authority of the government, in order to determine its value, commonly called money. Co. Litt. 207; Rutherf. Inst. 123. For the different kinds of coins of the United States, see article Money. As to the value of foreign coins, see article Foreign Coins.

References in classic literature ?
She offered the coin to each one individually, and each, as his turn came, rubbed his foot against his calf, shook his head, and grinned.
She took no notice, but held up the gold coin before the eyes of the boy of the swan dive.
As I ran down the streets to the sea, the coin clenched tight in my fist, I felt all the Roman Empire on my back as well as the Carstairs pedigree.
Then he said, with a clearly modulated and rather mincing articulation: `Would it discommode you to contribute elsewhere a coin with a somewhat different superscription?
Spider was the first to see the date, and ere any knew what his intention was he raised himself to his feet, and lunged over the side of the boat, to disappear forever into the green depths beneath--the coin had not been the 1875 piece.
The regulation of weights and measures is transferred from the articles of Confederation, and is founded on like considerations with the preceding power of regulating coin.
The youth stood there with the coin in his fingers, nonplused and bewildered; of course he had not understood a word.
He did not suppose you gave him so much money purposely, so he hurried back to return you the coin lest you might get away before you discovered your mistake.
Pick up that, philosopher and vendor of wine," said the Marquis, throwing him another gold coin, "and spend it as you will.
Without deigning to look at the assemblage a second time, Monsieur the Marquis leaned back in his seat, and was just being driven away with the air of a gentleman who had accidentally broke some common thing, and had paid for it, and could afford to pay for it; when his ease was suddenly disturbed by a coin flying into his carriage, and ringing on its floor.
sou = a small coin (5 centimes)--20 sous equal one franc}
He sewed the coin in the delicate leather, sewed the leather to the ribbon, tied the ends together.