Animal

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ANIMAL, property. A name given to every animated being endowed with the power of voluntary motion. In law, it signifies all animals except those of the him, in species.
     2. Animals are distinguished into such as are domitae, and such as are ferae naturae.
     3. It is laid down, that in tame or domestic animals, such as horse, swine, sheep, poultry, and the like, a man may have an absolute property, because they continue perpetually in his possession and occupation, and will not stray from his house and person unless by accident or fraudulent enticement, in either of which cases the owner does not lose his property. 2 Bl. Com. 390; 2 Mod. 319. 1.
     4. But in animals ferae naturae, a man can have no absolute property; they belong to him only while they continue in his keeping or actual possession; for if at any they regain their natural liberty, his property instantly ceases, unless they have animum revertendi, which is only to be known by their usual habit of returning. 2 Bl. Com. 396; 3 Binn. 546; Bro. Ab. Propertie, 37; Com. Dig. Biens, F; 7 Co. 17 b; 1 Ch. Pr. 87; Inst. 2, 1, 15. See also 3 Caines' Rep. 175; Coop. Justin. 457, 458; 7 Johns. Rep. 16; Bro. Ab. Detinue, 44.
     5. The owner of a mischievous animal, known to him to be so, is responsible, when he permits him to go at large, for the damages he may do. 2 Esp. Cas. 482; 4 Campb. 198; 1 Starkie's Cas. 285; 1 Holt, 617; 2 Str.1264; Lord Raym. 110; B. N. P. 77; 1 B. & A. 620; 2 C. M.& R. 496; 5 C.& P. 1; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 187. This principle agrees with the civil law. Domat, Lois Civ. liv. 2, t. 8, s. 2. And any person may justify the killing of such ferocious animals. 9 Johns. 233; 10. Johns. 365; 13 Johns. 312. The owner, of such an animal may be indicted for a common nuisance. 1 Russ. Ch. Cr. Law, 643; Burn's Just., Nuisance, 1.
     6. In Louisiana, the owner of an animal is answerable for the damage he may cause; but if the animal be lost, or has strayed more than a day, he may discharge himself from this responsibility, by abandoning him to the person who has sustained the injury; except where the master turns loose a dangerous or noxious animal; for then he must pay all the harm done, without being allowed to make the abandonment. Civ. Code, art. 2301. See Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.

References in periodicals archive ?
The low metabolic rates of cold-blooded animals may explain why a reptile can be the largest meat eater or vegetarian in an ecosystem.
With Life in Cold Blood, he brings viewers the final chapter of his epic overview of life on Earth, as he transforms perceptions of cold-blooded animals in another must-see TV treat.
Prior to the study, researchers had known that core body temperature and aging were related in cold-blooded animals. Scientists had also known that lifespan could be extended in warm-blooded animals by reducing the number of calories they consumed, which also lowered core body temperature.
Those with an interest in cold-blooded animals will be able to have a close encounter with some of the Hancock's very own reptiles including a bearded dragon, royal python and Brazilian rainbow boa.
There was a 14% rise in the number of "cold-blooded animals", such as fish, for "fundamental biological studies" including research for "human medicine, dentistry and veterinary science".
For example, for a long time scientists assumed that lizards and other cold-blooded animals have no ability to alter their body temperature because when observed in constant conditions in a laboratory environment the lizard's temperature would eventually match that of its surroundings.
Think before you buylReptiles are cold-blooded animals and rely on their surroundings to maintain their body temperature.
Absorbs heat from the sunlight, an important function for cold-blooded animals.
They act coolly; true in more than one way, as they are cold-blooded animals. Aquatic carnivores eat whatever they can catch.
Although Aeromonas species were recognized in 1891 as colonizers and pathogens of cold-blooded animals, especially fish [2], they were not identified as human pathogens until 1968 [3].
We know now that even cold-blooded animals get fevers.