colloquial

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He moved to Jarrow Colliery, and then Hetton Colliery before forming The Colliers of the United Association of Durham and Northumberland, colloquially known as Hepburn's Union.
The main aim of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), colloquially called stenting, is symptom relief, generally improved exercise tolerance and time.
While there were a number of substantial reasons behind both, the two events provoked reactions to the effect that Slovakia and its neighbours in Central and Eastern Europe, still colloquially labelled the "new" EU members, are discriminated against when it comes to high EU posts as well as hosting EU institutions."Europe is not just about a balance between the north and south, but about equal chances between old and new member states," Kazimir said as he arrived to the Eurogroup meeting before the vote and suggested that the representation from new member states is very small.
WHEN I first came to the area in the 1950s I watched United at St James' Park, known colloquially as Gallowgate.
In its inaugural press release, the party -- colloquially referred to as "the Russian party" due to many of its founders and backers being Cyprus-based Russian businessmen -- outlined its key goals, which it said include combating corruption and promoting a hi-tech culture that would respect multiculturalism, multi-ethnicity and religious freedom.
Also known as the 3rd Battle of Ypres or colloquially the "Battle of Mud" or the "Slough of Despond" The aim of the attack was the destruction of German submarine pens on the Belgium coast.
Sir James, 68, added: "We do know that people die from what colloquially we call a broken heart."
According to media reports, the US for the first time used what the military colloquially calls the 'mother of all bombs' at Nangarhar province of Afghanistan where 15 Indian citizens had been killed .
1: Secession to the Suffolk Campaign is an extensively researched accounting of the 5th Texas Infantry, colloquially known as "The Bloody Fifth", during the American Civil War.
The company has received the USD3bn account in a pitch that ends a yearlong series of reviews, colloquially called 'Mediapalooza'.
Today, they would be referred to as the "minister's spouse" although colloquially, and, before the ordination of women, they were known as the "minister's wife." This group, through marriage, entered a category for which no one prepared them.
The phrase, "the joint was jumping" is often used colloquially but could have been employed in its literal sense as it seemed everyone whose joints had survived intact since the 1970s was bouncing from the first number to the last.