come


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Related to come: come together
References in classic literature ?
Jackson's Island is good enough for me; I know that island pretty well, and nobody ever comes there.
It was that dull kind of a regular sound that comes from oars working in rowlocks when it's a still night.
I began to be afraid you would never come back again.
Bingley," said her mother, "I beg you will come here, and shoot as many as you please on Mr.
I have not forgot, you see; and I assure you, I was very much disappointed that you did not come back and keep your engagement.
At first the young gents was werry lively on him; but afore we got in, seeing how steady the old chap come on, they was quite quiet, and laid their heads together what they should do.
The guard had just finished an account of a desperate fight which had happened at one of the fairs between the drovers and the farmers with their whips, and the boys with cricket-bats and wickets, which arose out of a playful but objectionable practice of the boys going round to the public-houses and taking the linch-pins out of the wheels of the gigs, and was moralizing upon the way in which the Doctor, "a terrible stern man he'd heard tell," had come down upon several of the performers, "sending three on 'em off next morning in a po-shay with a parish constable," when they turned a corner and neared the milestone, the third from Rugby.
Tom stands up on the coach and looks back at his father's figure as long as he can see it; and then the guard, having disposed of his luggage, comes to an anchor, and finishes his buttonings and other preparations for facing the three hours before dawn--no joke for those who minded cold, on a fast coach in November, in the reign of his late Majesty.
She is dozing probably, for she gives no heed to his steps as he comes toward her.
The broken footway is so narrow that when Allan Woodcourt comes to where the woman sits, he has to turn into the road to pass her.
When Mother Maudlin comes to thank Maid Marian for her present, she is told that no such present was ever intended, and so she in anger curses the cook, casting spells upon him:
It breaks, and she comes back to her own shape, and Robin goes off, leaving her cursing.