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Close

A parcel of land that is surrounded by a boundary of some kind, such as a hedge or a fence. To culminate, complete, finish, or bring to an end. To seal up. To restrict to a certain class. A narrow margin, as in a close election.

A person can close a bank account; a trial may be closed after each lawyer has concluded his or her presentation in the case at bar.

close

(Intimate), adjective allied, bosom, brotherly, confidential, dear, devoted, faithful, familiar, fast, fraternal, friendly, inseparable, strongly attached
Associated concepts: close corporation, closely held

close

(Near), adjective adjacent, adjoining, approximate, at hand, bordering, close at hand, close by, coming, contiguous, forthcoming, handy, imminent, in close proximity, in the area, in the neighborrood, in the vicinity, near at hand, nearby, neighboring, nigh, propinquus, proximal, proximate, tangent, touching, vicinal
Associated concepts: close confinement, close proximity

close

(Rigorous), adjective assiduous, attentive, conscientious, diligent, earnest, exact, hard, harsh, keen, meticulous, parcus, precise, punctilious, rigid, scrupulous, severe, sharp, stiff, strict, stringent, tenax, uncompromising, unremitting, unsparing

close

(Conclusion), noun adjournment, cessation, closing, closure, completion, conclusio, consummation, discontinuance, discontinuation, end, ending, expiration, finis, finish, last part, last stage, omega, peroration, shutdown, stoppage, termination, terminus, windup
Associated concepts: the close of a trial, the closing on a real estate transaction

close

(Enclosed area), noun compound, confine, court, courtyard, enclosure, grounds, pen, precinct, square, yard
Associated concepts: breaking the close

close

(Agree), verb accept an offer, arrive at an agreeeent, bargain, come to an arrangement, come to an unnerstanding, come to terms, consent, endorse, enter into a contractual obligation, establish by agreement, execute, finalize an agreement, fix by agreement, give assurrnce, go to contract, guarantee, make a bargain, make an agreement, negotiate, pacisci, seek accord, settle, strike a bargain, subscribe, undertake, underwrite
Associated concepts: close a business transaction, close a real estate transaction

close

(Terminate), verb apply the closure, break off, bring to an end, call a halt, cause a stoppage, cease, come to a stop, come to an end, complete, conclude, consummate, discontinue, dispatch, dispose of, eliminate, end, expire, finish, finish up, fulfill, halt, have run its course, interrupt, make an end of, make inactive, operire, proseeute to a conclusion, put a stop to, run out, shut down, stop, surcease, suspend, suspend operation, wind up
Associated concepts: close a bank account, close a case, close a grand jury investigation, close an investigation
See also: abandon, approximate, block, brief, cease, cessation, clog, cognate, coherent, cohesive, compact, comparable, complete, conclude, conclusion, constrict, contestable, contiguous, culminate, death, defeasance, denouement, discontinue, dispatch, dissolution, end, exact, expiration, expire, extremity, faithful, finality, finish, future, grapple, halt, hidden, illiberal, immediate, imminent, inarticulate, indivisible, inhibit, inseparable, instant, intense, intimate, literal, local, lock, moratorium, noncommittal, obturate, occlude, outcome, pendent, pending, penurious, populous, precise, present, proximate, secret, shut, similar, solid, stop, strict, taciturn, terminate, termination

close

1 private property, usually enclosed by a fence, hedge, or wall.
2 a courtyard or quadrangle enclosed by buildings or an entry leading to such a courtyard.
3 the entry from the street to a tenement building.

CLOSE. Signifies the interest in the soil, and not merely a close or enclosure in the common acceptation of the term. Doct. & Stud. 307 East, 207 2 Stra. 1004; 6 East, 1541 Burr. 133 1 Ch. R. 160.
     2. In every case where one man has a right to exclude another from his land, the law encircles it, if not already enclosed, with an imaginary fence; and entitles him to a compensation in damages for the injury he sustains by the act of another passing through his boundary, denominating the injurious act a breach of the enclosure. Hamm. N. P. 151; Doct. & Stud. dial. 1, c. 8, p. 30; 2 Whart. 430.
     3. An ejectment will not lie for a close. 11 Rep. 55; 1 Rolle's R. 55 Salk. 254 Cro. Eliz. 235; Adams on Eject. 24.

References in periodicals archive ?
Any starting point selected from those regions, within a reasonable number of iterations, comes close to a root.
Although those colorful wildflowers continue to paint our hillsides in pinks and yellows with accents in whites and purples, the material that comes close to your home is fodder for next season's wildfires.
Simply put, there is absolutely nothing in the market today that comes close to ClearCalm(TM) Advantage
But in a movie that pits a Western superpower against a Muslim nation, Kapur never comes close to modern-day relevance.
But of those five, only ``In the Bedroom'' comes close to insightfully observing honest human behavior, and ``Moulin Rouge'' can be considered a formal breakthrough, which, by any standards, should be the highest virtues by which lasting film quality is judged.
They file and or serve about 17 million documents each year through LexisNexis File & Serve, and we believe that no other provider comes close in the number of subscribers and transaction volume.
Having written all but one of them herself (the only time the incomparable interpreter of other people's music has done so, outside of the 1985 ``Ballad of Sally Rose'' concept album), Harris sometimes comes close to the divine, melancholy combination of martial, religious and dashed romantic imagery of a Leonard Cohen (on ``Michelangelo'' and ``The Pearl,'' especially).
Whether your interest is commercial, financial, scientific or technological, no other publication comes close to providing such a comprehensive overview of current and future developments in the global orthopaedic market.
There is no word in the English language that rhymes with orange, although as Price points out ``door hinge'' comes close.