term

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Term

An expression, word, or phrase that has a fixed and known meaning in a particular art, science, or profession. A specified period of time.

The term of a court is the legally prescribed period for which it may be in session. Although the session of the court is the time that it actually sits, the words term and session are frequently used interchangeably.

In reference to a lease, a term is the period granted during which the lessee is entitled to occupy the rented premises. It does not include the period of time between the creation of the lease and the entry of the tenant. Similarly when used in reference to estates, the term is the period of time for which an estate is granted. An estate for five years, for example, is one with a five-year term.

A term of office is the time during which an official who has been appointed or elected may hold the office, perform its functions, and partake of its emoluments and privileges.

term

n. 1) in contracts or leases, a period of time, such as five years, in which a contract or lease is in force. 2) in contracts, a specified condition or proviso. 3) a period for which a court sits or a legislature is in session. 4) a word or phrase for something, as "tenancy" is one term for "occupancy."

term

(Duration), noun age, course, era, incumbency, interval, lifetime, period, reign, season, session, span, spatium temporis, spell, stage, tenancy, tenure, time
Associated concepts: term for years, term insurance, term of a lease, term of confinement, term of court, term of office
Foreign phrases: Terminus annorum certus debet esse et determinatus.A term of years ought to be certain and determinate.

term

(Expression), noun appellation, appellative, denomination, designation, epithet, heading, idiom, locution, name, phrase, title, verbalism, verbum, vocable, vocabulum, word
Associated concepts: definition of terms

term

(Provision), noun agreement, arrangement, artiile of agreement, bargain, clause, condicio, condition, covenant, item, lex, limitation, particular, point, proviso, qualification, specification, stipulation, understanding
Associated concepts: terms and conditions of a contract, terms of a policy, terms of payment, terms of sale
See also: call, clause, condition, define, denominate, denomination, division, duration, expiration, finality, identify, label, life, lifetime, option, period, phase, phrase, provision, purview, qualification, session, technicality, tenure, time, title

RULE, TERM, English practice. A term rule is in the nature of a day rule, by which a prisoner is enabled by the terms of one rule, instead of a daily rule, to quit the prison or its rules for the purpose of transacting his business. lt is obtained in the same manner as a day rule. See Rules.

TERM, construction. Word; expression speech.
     2. Terms or words are characters by which we announce our sentiments, and make known to others things with which we are acquainted. These must be properly construed or interpreted in order to understand the parties using them. Vide Construction; Interpretation; Word.

TERM, contracts. This word is used in the civil, law to denote the space of time granted to the debtor for discharging his obligation; there are express terms resulting from the positive stipulations of the agreement; as, where one undertakes to pay a certain sum on a certain day and also terms which tacitly result from the nature of the things which are the object of the engagement, or from the place where the act is agreed to be done. For instance, if a builder engage to construct a house for me, I must allow a reasonable time for fulfilling his engagement.
     2. A term is either of right or of grace; when it makes part of the agreement and is expressly or tacitly included in it, it is of right when it is not part of the agreement, it is of grace; as if it is not afterwards granted by the judge at the requisition of the debtor. Poth. on Oblig. P. 2, c. 3, art. 3; 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 719 et seq.

TERM, estates. The limitation of an estate, as a term for years, for life, and the like. The word term does not merely signify the time specified in the lease, but the estate also and interest that passes by that lease; and therefore the term may expire during the continuance of the time, as by surrender, forfeiture and the like. 2 Bl. Com. 145; 8 Pick. R. 339.
     TERM, practice. The space of time during which a court holds a session; sometimes the term is a monthly, at others it is a quarterly period, according to the constitution of the court.
     2. The whole term is considered as but one day so that the judges may at any time during the term, revise their judgments. In the computation of the term all adjournments are to be included. 9 Watts, R. 200. Courts are presumed to know judicially when their terms are required to be held by public law. 4 Dev. R. 427. See, 1 generally, Peck, R. 82; 6 Yerg. R. 395; 7 Yerg. R. 365; 6 Rand. R. 704; 2 Cowen, R. 445; 1 Cowen, R. 58; 5 Binn. R. 389; 4 S. & R. 507 5 Mass. R. 195, 435.

References in periodicals archive ?
The utility of Coming to Terms, however, can be considered twofold.
And the David James who next May will be coming to terms with a future as an innkeeper.
But I think as a teamwe are coming to terms with batting an extra hour and using our 55 overs.
Edited by Leo Panitch & Colin Leys, Coming to Terms with Nature: Socialist Register 2007 is an anthology of essays by learned authors discussing the dramatic ecological challenges to capitalism today, and whether socialist thought has progressed sufficiently to address capitalism's weakness in this regard.
Anyone who dismisses this as an aged perv's fantasy is missing how keenly screenwriter Hanif Kureishi understands coming to terms with mortality (and obviously hasn't seen his and director Roger Michell's ``The Mother,'' which looked at a similar situation just as perceptively from an elderly woman's perspective).
Lies That Bind uses the format of a novel to lay out and illustrate the issues of a young gay boy coming to terms with his same-gender sexual orientation who can no longer play the "I'm-not-gay" game with his family that has resulted in severe depression.
His summer will involve not only helping his uncle, but getting to know his aunt, coming to terms with her death, and maybe even accepting his uncle hasn't quite left his past behind in this moving story of discovery.
Emily begins to unravel the family secrets of her present time with clues from the past, while in real time, Emily is coming to terms with her parents' divorce and learning to navigate her relationship with her controlling mom.
Not only was his body damaged, he was also ending a relationship with a woman and coming to terms with his sexuality.
In the mid-'90s Louis-Jensen reappeared on the commercial gallery scene with Buddhist thangka paintings that showed the former agitator coming to terms with painterly ornament.
Readers, who are likely to be involved already in the study of these questions, are thereby invited to consider problems of scope and method in relation to two disciplines, one of them now much more attentive to its social context and the other still coming to terms with its recent fashionableness.
Just emerging from almost 40 years of civil war that claimed the lives of 200,000 and displaced many times that figure, this nation of 12 million is far from coming to terms with its violent past.